Did you know?

Fundraising & charity
09 Oct 2018 - Noushka Galley

Unique Sensory Struggles

Sensory Spectacle asked me to list a few hang ups I had that were directly realted to having autism. Below are 10 things I struggled with but are now not really a problem for me.

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Unique Sensory Struggles


Sensory Spectacle asked me to list a few hang ups I had that were directly realted to having autism. Below are 10 things I struggled with but are now not really a problem for me.


1) Hugging

I feel awkward when people hug me but I still respond with a light hug back. Sometimes I initiate one using the same social rules I have picked up on when going along with small talk. I don’t get why people do it, but it seems rude or more awkward for other people if I don’t respond.

 

2) Getting your hair cut

It’s not a sensory problem to get it cut or lightened and dyed at a salon. I can bang my head on a shelf or open cupboard door and just carry on, but hair spray does make me retch and swallow. I condition rather than cut my ends to preserve length- it’s my aesthetic style preference.

 

3) Using escalators or Lifts

As a very young child I used to have to be warned and the longer I checked the speed of the escalator the less I wanted to use it- the scariest idea was getting one foot on and not having time to fully step on- I was scared I would fall over or do the splits (going down escalators was the worst because you could see the angle and height you could fall at).

 

4) Find yourself shouting

I raise my voice when I am enthused about what I’m talking about. I don’t realise until people say I’m shouting. When I try to be quieter, I’m told I’m mumbling. It’s hard to judge because I hear myself at a constant volume because my mouth is next to my ears.

 

5) Gag easily

Anything soft/fluffy and dry can make my throat close up- hair spray, wool and gloves covering my fingernails is especially bad.

 

6) Being told you're heavy handed

Because I am aware that my hand-eye coordination is not my strongest asset, I actually compensate by going to the other extreme and dropping things, or taking a noticeably longer time setting items carefully down on tables.

 

7) Brushing your teeth

Toothpaste used to hurt because the flavour was overpowering when I was a child and was getting used to switching from infant to adult toothpaste. Mouthwash also hurt but my sense of tatse has calmed down with time, so I am able to overlook ingrediants I don’t like in meals and use a wider range of toiletries without wincing, or neglecting things due to smell colour and taste.

 

8) Difficulty sitting still

I just like to fidget, I have never been sure why, I just seem to get bored or tired much quicker and my focus goes if I’m not moving constantly. However, I can stand very still for hours and don’t get the same problem.

 

9) Washing your hands

I have to do this half-way through a big lot of washing up- I like how my skin is not left slimy by hand soap but washing up liquid is slimy. I like the smell and how my skin is softened by soaps and creams for hands.

 

10) Wearing your hood up

I used to keep my head covered with a hat- hoods don’t turn with my head making crossing roads dangerous. I used to like keeping my ears warm and protected from loud noises but this need has reduced with time and I like to keep my hair less oily by avoiding hoods and hats nowadays.

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Construction & regeneration
08 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square

One Chamberlain Square is nearing external completion with some of the retail space windows going in, the upper sill on the front is almost complete. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of One Chamberlain Square




One Chamberlain Square is nearing external completion with some of the retail space windows going in, the upper sill on the front is almost complete. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Construction & regeneration
07 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Bank Tower Two

It looks like another big chunk of cladding is ready to be revealed and the main structure is nearing the last few floors. Lots of photos in this update, view them in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Bank Tower Two




It looks like another big chunk of cladding is ready to be revealed and the main structure is nearing the last few floors. Lots of photos in this update, view them in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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People & community
07 Oct 2018 - Kate Goodall

Kings Heath Volunteers

Much of the work done in Kings Heath, is lead by fantastic volunteers, who undertake all sorts of projects under the radar, from gardening, to maintenance and painting. Here are just a couple of volunteers that are very communtiy driven - can you tell who they are?

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Gallery

People & community
07 Oct 2018 - Kate Goodall

Back of the Kingsway Cinema

Designed by Horace G Bradley and built in the 1920s, The Kingsway was for decades used as a cinema until it closed in 1980.It reopened as a bingo hall a few years later before closing down for good in 2007, only to be ravaged by a fire in 2011. The frontage is all that remains and hopefully will become the frontage for new things in this part of the High Street soon.

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Did you know?

Civic pride
06 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Cadbury Brothers: George and Richard Cadbury

You may have heard about Bournville, and Cadbury chocolate, but do you know about the Brothers behind the company? We take a look at George Cadbury and his brother Richard Cadbury. They were the sons of John Cadbury who founded the original Cadbury company. They aquired land south west of Birmingham in 1878, in what is now Bournville.

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Cadbury Brothers: George and Richard Cadbury




You may have heard about Bournville, and Cadbury chocolate, but do you know about the Brothers behind the company? We take a look at George Cadbury and his brother Richard Cadbury. They were the sons of John Cadbury who founded the original Cadbury company. They aquired land south west of Birmingham in 1878, in what is now Bournville.


George Cadbury lived from 1839 until 1922.

With his brother Richard, they acquired land to the south west of Birmingham in 1878 and built their factory there in 1879. He helped start the development of the Bournville Village from around 1900 onwards. There is no pubs as the Cadbury's were Quakers.

George lived at 32 George Road in Edgbaston from 1872 until 1881. There is an English Heritage blue plaque on this house

The Bournville Village Trust was established in 1900 by George Cadbury.  We take a look at some of the buildings built during George Cadbury's lifetime in the early part of the 20th century.

The Bournville Carillon was built in 1906 by W Alexander Harvey. It is now part of Bournville Junior School. You can sometimes hear the bells ringing if you are in Bournville, it is quite a unique sound!

A bust of George Cadbury is outside of the Quaker Meeting House. That was built in 1905 by W Alexander Harvey. The Cadbury's were Quaker's.

The Rest House in Bournville Village Green. Built in 1914 by W Alexander Harvey to mark the silver wedding of George Cadbury and his then wife. It is now a visitor centre for the Carillon.

If you enter Bournville from the Cotteridge end or the Selly Oak end, you might see this sign. It has a photo of George Cadbury at the top welcoming you to Bournville!

Richard Cadbury lived from 1835 until 1899 and was and elder brother of George.

With his brother George, he took over the family business in 1861, and they eventually acquired land four miles to the south west of Birmingham by 1878 and built the Cadbury chocolate factory a year later. He dontated Moseley Hall to the City of Birmingham, and it is now a hospital.

Richard lived at 17 Wheeleys Road in Edgbaston from 1861 until 1871. There is a English Heritage blue plaque on this house.

Richard Cadbury bought the Moseley Hall estate in 1889. He then gave it as a children's home. It was built in 1795. Is now known as Moseley Hall Hospital.

Another property in Moseley, this one on the Queensbridge Road is the Uffculme Centre (not far from the Highbury Estate). Built for Richard Cadbury in 1890. It was his last home from 1891 until his death in 1899. His family lived there until the death of his widow in 1906. The house was later gifted to the City of Birmingham in 1916 when it became a hospital until around 1999. Now used as a conference centre.

Almshouses built in Bournville by Richard Cadbury for the benefit of the Cadbury workers. The railings were removed during the Second World War, but new ones were installed in 2008 by the Bournville Village Trust.

 

You might be familiar with this building if you pass through Bournville, either on the train or walking along the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. The Cadbury Factory building, on this site from 1879 onwards. Cadbury World has been inside part of the site since the early 1990s.

View from the Worcester & Birmingham Canal over looking the Cross City Line South.

The famous Bournville sign.

The famous Cadbury sign.

Photos by Elliott Brown.

 

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Transport
05 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Tram Stops in Birmingham City Centre

A look at the Tram Stops in Birmingham City Centre, from Jewellery Quarter to Grand Central. Originally the old terminus from 1999 until 2015 was at Snow Hill on the former platform 4 of the railway station, before the first extension opened to Birmingham New Street Station by 2016.

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Tram Stops in Birmingham City Centre




A look at the Tram Stops in Birmingham City Centre, from Jewellery Quarter to Grand Central. Originally the old terminus from 1999 until 2015 was at Snow Hill on the former platform 4 of the railway station, before the first extension opened to Birmingham New Street Station by 2016.


Jewellery Quarter Tram Stop

The tram stop opened on the 31st May 1999 and is between Soho Benson Road and St Paul's. Jewellery Quarter Station itself opened in 1995. The station is near the mouth of the Hockley No 2 Tunnel. Interchange between trams and trains is quite easy here as there is a gate you can walk through.

Tram seen from the train at Jewellery Quarter Station.

 

St Pauls Tram Stop

The tram stop opened on the 31st May 1999 between Jewellery Quarter and Snow Hill. Pedestrians can access the tram stop from Constitution Hill. From the bridge above you have views of Birmingham Snow Hill Station plus the Snowhill development. Photo below was when Two Snowhill was just a pair of cores (was a delay of several years before it got going again). These days you can watch Three Snowhill being built!

The platforms were altered on all stations from St Paul's to Wolverhampton St George's to allow room for the new Urbos 3 trams.

 

St Chad's Tram Stop (formerly Snow Hill Tram Stop)

This tram stop opened on the 2nd June 2016 replacing the old Snow Hill Tram Stop. Originally named Snow Hill, but the stop is a bit far from the entrances of Birmingham Snow Hill, so it was renamed to St Chad's in January 2017. Took a while before the new lift and stairs around it opened to the public. Interchange between tram and train is best done at Jewellery Quarter or The Hawthorns. Here you would have to get the lift down or walk down the stairs. Then walk past the Queensway and turn onto Livery Street to get into the Livery Street entrance of Birmingham Snow Hill Station.

The former tram stop terminus was open from 1999 to 2015 at what was platform 4 of Birmingham Snow Hill Station, just finishing close to the Snow Hill Tunnel. It opened on 31st May 1999 and closed on 24th October 2015. The approach line was disconnected.

Snow Hill Tram Stop - the former terminus used from 1999 until 2015.

Bull Street Tram Stop

The tram stop was the first to open on the first city centre extension on 6th December 2015. And was initially the new terminus due to the delay of opening Corporation Street and Grand Central. There was a visit of the Queen to officially open the line where she named tram 35 "Angus Adams".

Pair of trams seen in 2016 around the time that the terminus moved from Bull Street to Grand Central (or was about to).

Corporation Street Tram Stop

The tram stop opened on the 30th May 2016 after being delayed from December 2015. There is only a shelter on the side towards Wolverhampton. Currently no shelter on the platform towards Grand Central, although that could change once the second extension to Centenary Square opens in the future. Ozzy Osbourne came to name a tram after himself, no 37 at this stop in late May 2016.

Tram 37 Ozzy Osbourne departs from Corporation Street Tram Stop bound for Wolverhampton.

Grand Central Tram Stop

The last tram stop on the first city centre extension opened on the 30th May 2016 next to Birmingham New Street Station. It is on Stephenson Street. Trams normally go beyond the stop to the top of Stephenson Street, before heading onto a spur to get to the other side. But this will change from late September 2018 to allow the extension to Westside to be added to the existing tracks. The next stop will be Town Hall (for Victoria Square) followed by Centenary Square. Eventually the line will go as far as the bottom of Hagley Road at Five Ways.

Pair of trams seen at Grand Central Tram Stop.

 

Photos by Elliott Brown.

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Inspiration

People & community
05 Oct 2018 - Chris Fletcher

'Why we chose to move to the Jewellery Quarter" - Chris and Em

In the first of our 'City Living' featured posts, new residents of the Jewellery Quarter, Chis and Em, tell us why they made the JQ move!

Take the full post to see why.

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'Why we chose to move to the Jewellery Quarter" - Chris and Em




In the first of our 'City Living' featured posts, new residents of the Jewellery Quarter, Chis and Em, tell us why they made the JQ move!

Take the full post to see why.


Moving to the city had never really occurred to us until early last year. We knew we didn't want to live in Tyseley anymore, Em in the house she had bought as a teenager and me, in a house that I loved because it was part of her, and us, but never truly mine. And the area was not for us anymore, a creative couple, a couple with no kids, a couple who are in their 40s but prefer to live a 20s lifestyle.

But where to move to? The city or the countryside? To another city? Another country?

Photography by Chris Fletcher

Deciding on our forever home is not a decision to be rushed, so instead we decided to make a less permanent move for now, one which would give us a taster of a lifestyle we craved without commitment. So where to move to short-term? We were unanimous - we wanted to try city centre living for a while, and we wanted the Jewellery Quarter to be our base.

"Urban reflections in JQ" by Chris Fletcher

Ask Em why she picked the Jewellery Quarter, and she'd probably reel off a list of bars and restaurants with gin and cocktail lists she intends to work through. And don't get me wrong, the proximity to some great craft beer and real ale pubs was also a factor in my decision, but the Jewellery Quarter is so much more than an eating and drinking hub. For me, as a photographer, it's the thought of having interesting content right outside my front door. Over the summer of 2018 I spent a great deal of time in the Jewellery Quarter, capturing the doors and windows of some of the magnificent buildings. There are stories behind those doors, hints to the history of an area which has played such an important part in Birmingham's industrial and manufacturing heritage. 

"Wonderful stories behind those windows and doors" by Chris Fletcher

Living in the Jewellery Quarter means that my day doesn't finish when I arrive home from work. I no longer have to shut the front door behind me and not surface until the morning because there is nowhere to go without effort. Em and I can now dissect our days in a coffee shop or bar, or just in our light and airy apartment. We can take our laptops and phones, and catch up with our social media, blogging and photo admin over a coffee or a pint (depending on the time of day). Meeting up with friends becomes easier, there's no more clock-watching to make sure we leave for the last train home. And if we ever get bored of our beloved Jewellery Quarter, the city centre itself is.just a 10 minute walk away.

"Downtown Birmingham" by Chris Fletcher

I can even get on to the canal network right at the end of our street - those who know my photography will know just how much I love to capture canals and their reflections.

"Canal walking through Birmingham" by Chris Fletcher

Our move to the Jewellery Quarter is - at the moment - only a temporary one but we may love the lifestyle so much that we decide to never leave. JQ, you have 12 months to convince us.

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45 passion points

Inspiration

Transport
04 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Diesel locomotives at the Tyseley Locomotive Works

It's not just steam locomotives to be found at a Tyseley Locomotive Works open day. They also have diesel engines in their collection, plus other diesel engines come to visit, or are there for maintenance / restoration as well.

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Diesel locomotives at the Tyseley Locomotive Works




It's not just steam locomotives to be found at a Tyseley Locomotive Works open day. They also have diesel engines in their collection, plus other diesel engines come to visit, or are there for maintenance / restoration as well.


In this post, we will show you what diesel locomotives are in Tyseley's collection, or which ones have visited on open days. Most of them were in service between the 1950s and 1980s before they were retired. Many were scrapped, some were preserved.

 

Their only operational Class 47 is 47773. Built 1964. BR Co-Co Class 47. Also known as D1755 The Queen Mother. Seen below in the engine shed at Tyseley. You can also see it from the walkway above. Although the best views of it was from both ends of the train.

Seen below in September 2016 was 47760 owned by West Coast Railways. It is now located at Carnforth.

37263 seen at the September 2016 open day. BR Co-Co Class 37. Built in 1965. It is currently located at the Telford Steam Railway.

40 118 seen at the September 2018 open day. BR 1Co-Co1 Class 40. Built 1961. Undergoing a major restoration.

50 033 seen at the September 2016 open day. It is named "Glorious". BR Co-Co Class 50. Built 1968. Glorious 'Hoover' is now undergoing a restoration at Kidderminster. It arrived at the Severn Valley Railway in late May 2018. They are hoping to get it ready for the gala marking 50 years of Class 50s.

A visitor to the Tyseley Locomotive Works in April 2018 was 56301. Class 56. Now owned by the Class 56 Group. Built sometime between 1976 and 1984. It was delivered to Tyseley by lorry propably for an open day that spring.

13029 (08021) from the area where you can watch steam trains going up the line nearby. BR 0-6-0 Class 08. Built 1953.

On open days they have one train at Tyseley Warwick Road with a Buffet Car. In September 2016 that was behind The Flying Scotsman. This time in September 2018 the Buffet Car was close to the buffer. There was about four Class 50 trains behind.

Now a look at the four visiting Class 50 diesel locomotives that were at Tyseley Warwick Road behind the buffet car.

 

50 006 Neptune. D406. Built 1968. Named in 1978. The first Class 50 to be refurbished. The original Neptune was scrapped in 1988. It is actually 50 007 Hercules (that number / name pair could be seen on from the other platform).

50 007 Hercules. D407. Built 1968. Named 1978. Renamed to Sir Edward Elgar in 1984. Renamed back to Hercules in 2014. Now owned by the Class 50 Alliance. 50 006 Neptune is on the other side of the train.

50 011 Centurion.  D411. Built 1968. Named 1978. First Class 50 to be withdrawn. The original Centurion was scrapped in 1992. It is actually 50 049 Defiance (that number / name pair could be seen from the other platform).

50 049 Defiance.  D449. Built 1968. Named 1978. Now owned by the Class 50 Alliance. 50 011 Centurion is on the other side of the train.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown at the September 2016 and September 2018 open days at the Tyseley Locomotive Works.

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
03 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley

Construction at Arena Central - October 2018

Here's a nice reflection of the Library of Birmingham in One Centenary Square, the new HSBC UK headquarters, but it's Dandara that is now dominating the site. See the photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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Construction at Arena Central - October 2018




Here's a nice reflection of the Library of Birmingham in One Centenary Square, the new HSBC UK headquarters, but it's Dandara that is now dominating the site. See the photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Construction & regeneration
01 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square

Construction at Paradise Birmingham is accelerating with Two Chamberlain Square over two thirds up with it's main structure. View the full post for more.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square




Construction at Paradise Birmingham is accelerating with Two Chamberlain Square over two thirds up with it's main structure. View the full post for more.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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60 passion points

Inspiration

Transport
01 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Tyseley Locomotive Works 50th Anniversary

The 50th Anniversary of the Tyseley Locomotive Works was in late September 2018. There are regular open days held at Tyseley ever year. The site is run by Vintage Trains who restores old steam locomotives, and sometimes has them on the national network such as the Shakespeare Express.

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Tyseley Locomotive Works 50th Anniversary




The 50th Anniversary of the Tyseley Locomotive Works was in late September 2018. There are regular open days held at Tyseley ever year. The site is run by Vintage Trains who restores old steam locomotives, and sometimes has them on the national network such as the Shakespeare Express.


Originally built in 1908 as the Great Western Railway's Tyseley depot, Vintage Trains has been operating here since the mid to late 1960s restoring old steam locomotives. At one point the Tyseley Locomotive Works was known as the Birmingham Railway Museum, but the site is now only open to the public on certain open days during each year. They also attract vintage cars, traction engines and model railway clubs to the site. In September 2016, the famous Flying Scotsman paid a visit to Tyseley and Birmingham.

Part of the site is now the West Midlands Railway Diesel Multiple-Unit Depot (formerly London Midland / Central Trains / British Rail), but here we are focussing on the vintage trains part of the site.

You will find that a lot of the trains are giving off steam (especially the steam locomotives on site). Most of the main loco's are positioned around the turntable in the middle.

The turntable seen in 2016.

No 1. Called Percy. Peckett and Sons 0-4-0ST. Lined Maroon. Built 1942.

5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe. GWR 4-6-0 4073 Castle Class. BR Green, Early Emblem. Built 1936.

Seen on the turntable in September 2018 the recently restored 7029 Clun Castle. GWR 4-6-0 4073 Castle Class. BR Green, Late Crest. Built 1950.

Seen in September 2016. 4965 Rood Ashton Hall. GWR 4-6-0 49xx Hall Class. GWR Green. Built 1931.

Seen during September 2016 around the turntable. 5593 Kolhapur. 5XP Jubilee. Built in 1934. Now on display waiting a restoration.

Seen on the open day of September 2018. 45596 Bahamas. LMS 4-6-0 5XP Jubilee. Built 1935. Used to be at the National Railway Museum in York. Moved to the Tyseley Locomotive Works in 2013 for restoration. Bahamas Locomotive Society have owned it since 1967.

9600 is used on open days to pull the carriages so visitors can enjoy a train ride. It was not used in September 2018 (but was in September 2016). GWR 0-6-0PT 57xx Class. Built 1945.

L94 London Transport seen pulling carriages with visitors enjoying a train ride up and down the line. You get on at Tyseley Warwick Road if you have tickets. Seen September 2018. GWR 0-6-0PT 57xx Class.Built 1930. Used on the London Underground from 1959 to 1971.

Something you don't normally see much at Tyseley is 60103 The Flying Scotsman. It visited Birmingham and the Midlands in September 2016, and was at Tyseley Warwick Road for the open day. It also went on the Severn Valley Railway at the time, and you could also see it on the Snow Hill lines. It had come down from the National Railway Museum in York, and was making a nationwide tour after a decade long restoration of the famous engine!

During the open day visits, you get a chance to see what locomotives that are undergoing restoration, or what they are building here.

In September 2016, 7029 Clun Castle was undergoing a full restoration. It was completed by October 2017. See the photo above of it on the turntable during the September 2018 open day.

Another engine was seen in the same spot in September 2018 undergoing a restoration / rebuild. 4936 Kinlet Hall can be seen having an overhaul to the left. It was bought in 1981 by the Kinlet Hall Locomotive Company. It had operated on various heritage railways, first restoration completed at Tyseley in 1996. It needed a second restoration from summer 2016, and is now undergoing a complete overhaul. While 71000 The Impossible Dream was still to the right. More on that engine below.

No 670 seen in September 2016. This was a completely new steam locomotive. They started to build it in 1986! But as of 2018 it has never been finished! It is a LNWR Bloomer Class 2-2-2 replica. Was 90% completed by 1990.

A close up look at The Impossible Dream 71000 The Duke of Gloucester. Built in 1954. BR Standard Class 8 4-6-2. Seen at the September 2018 open day, it is still under going restoration. They need donations to help restore it. A long way to go.

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40 passion points

Introducing

People & community
30 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

JQwithYou - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!

With a reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome the Jewellery Quarter as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about JQ. Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is the Jewellery Quarter!

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JQwithYou - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!




With a reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome the Jewellery Quarter as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about JQ. Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is the Jewellery Quarter!


JQwithYou is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact. JQwithYou is connected to BirminghamWeAre, the City's Community of Passion to deliver a massive reach and maximise the exposure of JQ passion.

FreeTimePays is delighted to provide this unique collaborative digital space for people who are passionate about the Jewellery Quarter and want to do whatever they can to help promote their community.

At JQwithYou, we help connect people where passions are shared; we give people FREE access to their very own digital space where they can promote their passion; and we recognise people for the contributions they make through the allocation of Passion Points. Interested? Connect with us HERE.

The reach of FreeTimePays is huge and is growing with Communities of Passion being rolled out across the UK. 

Companies and organisations keen to support People with Passion play an essential role and we have a range of partnership, sponsorship and advertising packages available.

We can even go as far as to set groups and networks up with their own portal so they can grow their own branded Community of Passion linked to their own website or social media account.

View our Partnership arrangements or connect with us HERE.

Now let's show you what you get with FreeTimePays. 

FreeTimePays

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Passport, Community Workspace and Community Matchmaker. Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

FreeTimePays is here for people who really want to become involved in their community or with their particular passion and for those people who are really serious about making a difference. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the great ideas with those who have the potential to turn an idea into something that really does make a difference.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways.

They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the opportunity to take up offers and win prizes.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or project.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share in building evidence, acquiring knowledge and developing plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of facilities and tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is MAKING A DIFFERENCE. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the GREAT IDEAS with those who have the potential to turn an IDEA into something that really does MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Matchmaker is where the dreamers can join with the dream makers – with those who are more than happy to put their support, their resources, their connections, and their wealth of experience behind the idea and behind the passionate people responsible for coming up with the idea.

These are the community drivers, the investors, the philanthropists, the funders of great initiatives, the Lottery, and those from local government and the public sector who are responsible for the provision of public services.

These are the people and the organisations who are in positions of making things happen for those who are passionate and inspired to want to make a difference.

For more detail on what is provided by FreeTimePays connect HERE.

JQwithYou

JQwithYou will grow as a shared space for the many individuals, communities and businesses that will want to connect and share in their passion for their community.

Their work, their ideas and their proposals can be pulled together in the one collaborative space giving them access to a huge resource bank for sharing images, documents and web links. 

In this space people can chat in a secure environment if they wish; they can set up and promote events; or they can communicate with any of the FreeTimePays Communities through creating and submitting posts.

We would be delighted to tell you more.

Contact Jonathan Bostock at jonathan.bostock@freetimepays.com or connect HERE with FreeTimePays for more information on sharing your passion for the Jewellery Quarter.

 

 

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40 passion points

Introducing

People & community
29 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Are you passionate about the Jewellery Quarter? Join Us!

JQwithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change & positive social impact in the JQ.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for the Jewellery Quarter and connect with people who share their passion.

View our post.

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Are you passionate about the Jewellery Quarter? Join Us!




JQwithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change & positive social impact in the JQ.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for the Jewellery Quarter and connect with people who share their passion.

View our post.

JQwithYou is all about engaging people in the passion that is the Jewellery Quarter.

JQwithYou is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

Connect with us HERE and take your passion to the next level.

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
29 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square

There is a section of the building that can now be photographed as finished and some architectural detail shots become possible, more in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of One Chamberlain Square




There is a section of the building that can now be photographed as finished and some architectural detail shots become possible, more in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Introducing

People & community
28 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Free Time really does pay for people with passion in Birmingham!

BirminghamWeAre is the first Community of Passion to be given access to a 'created here in Birmingham' digital space devoted to the delivery of social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is a unique collaborative environment and social media channel that connects, promotes and rewards people with passion.

Take the full post to find out more. 

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Free Time really does pay for people with passion in Birmingham!




BirminghamWeAre is the first Community of Passion to be given access to a 'created here in Birmingham' digital space devoted to the delivery of social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is a unique collaborative environment and social media channel that connects, promotes and rewards people with passion.

Take the full post to find out more. 


It is only right that people should feel proud of where they live and feel a part of the community with whom they share that space.

In the case of Birmingham, people should be rightly proud of their City and their Community. However, this can only realistically happen if people feel part of a wider vision and part of something which they can not only have a say about but which they can personally influence, contribute to and benefit from.

That is exactly why FreeTimePays was built.

People also have passion!

How many times do we hear people refer to their passion by saying "my passion is ...." or "I am passionate about ...".

It is our assertion and belief that the vast majority of people have a passion or have something they are passionate about.  It could be something they enjoy participating in, something they follow as a hobby, or something they really aspire to become, achieve or pursue as a career.

With help, direction and support, passions can be nurtured and dreams can be realised for the benefit of so many people.

The purpose behind the FreeTimePays build has been to provide a digital space for people who want to create impact (socially and economically), a space for people who want to make a difference, and a space where people can realise their dreams and aspirations – we call this, the delivery of real passion!

The potential rewards of a digital space that people can use, either individually or collectively, in shaping their ideas, promoting their passion and collectively creating impact are huge!

The aims and goals of those behind this unique digital platform are rightly ambitious.

However, the desired outcome and the potential impact are also extremely realistic!

What is BirminghamWeAre?

BirminghamWeAre is a Community of Passion that is dedicated to engaging, involving, but (most importantly) supporting the people of Birmingham in shared passion. Via a portal, this community has been given complete access to use FreeTimePays technology for creating impact.

There is no other digitally connected community comparable to BirminghamWeAre.

Back in 2016, at the time FreeTimePays digital space was being built, an account was set up on twitter called BirminghamWeAre.

The purpose of using an existing social media channel was to introduce people to the difference they can make and the positive impact they can have on their city and on their community and how such impact can be reflected through rewards and recognition.

In just a few years, BirminghamWeAre has attracted not just a large following, but a following that consists of people who really do want to get involved and help make a difference.

The BirminghamWeAre twitter account has been an excellent channel for identifying #PeoplewithPassion who share #BirminghamPassion. The twitter account alone now delivers 0.5 million impressions every month and is growing fast.

This and other social media accounts set up at that time have all helped to identify people who really do want to make a difference, people who have some great ideas and people who can, collectively and individually, create impact for the benefit of themselves, their community and their City.

Over 30 passions that can help shape the City

At BirminghamWeAre, we have identified over 30 passions that, if followed, supported and pursued, can have a direct and positive influence on the City and for Community. 

These are passions that are not just important to people who live in, work in and/or visit Birmingham, they are passions that if supported and nurtured will help the City in its drive for continued economic growth and prosperity. 

The potential for delivering positive social impact is just as great. These are all passions that can have a direct impact on community and on the effective inclusion and cohesion of people that collectively make up and represent the City of Birmingham.

So what now?

Passion by passion and neighbourhood by neighbourhood, we will look to develop constructive partnerships. These partnerships will include individuals, community champions, business leaders and local government - people and stakeholders who collectively have an interest in driving passion to create positive social impact.

The make-up of FreeTimePays

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Workspace, Community Matchmaker and Community Passport.  Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways. They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the recognition for the impact they are having and the difference they are making.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or initiative.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share the same space in order to build evidence, acquire knowledge and develop plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of applications and engagement tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

This space is where content is pulled together and posts created for submission across multiple sites in order to reach a wide, diverse, but also, well targeted audience.  

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is MAKING A DIFFERENCE. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the GREAT IDEAS with those who have the potential to turn an IDEA into something that really does MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Further details:

Connect with us HERE and let's discuss your passion. 

 

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Did you know?

Civic pride
27 Sep 2018 - Elliott Brown

Thomas Attwood: Birmingham's first Member of Parliament

Did you know that Birmingham's first MP was Thomas Attwood from 1832 to 1840. There has been two statues honouring him in Birmingham, one dated 1859 and the other more recently in 1993. He lobbied for a Reform Bill and he founded the Birmingham Politcal Union at the end of 1829.

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Thomas Attwood: Birmingham's first Member of Parliament




Did you know that Birmingham's first MP was Thomas Attwood from 1832 to 1840. There has been two statues honouring him in Birmingham, one dated 1859 and the other more recently in 1993. He lobbied for a Reform Bill and he founded the Birmingham Politcal Union at the end of 1829.


Before 1832, Birmingham didn't have any represenation in Parliament. A Birmingham Banker called Thomas Attwood founded the Birmingham Political Union in 1829.

Portrait of Thomas Attwood seen at the Birmingham History Galleries at the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

It called for extending voting to the working class and redistributing suffrage rights. A Reform Bill of this kind went to Parliament in 1831, before the passing of the 1832 Reform Act.

In May 1832, The Birmingham Political Union met at New Hall Hill where about 200,000 people gathered calling for political reform.

Painting below seen at the Birmingham History Galleries painted by Benjamin Haydon.

After the Reform Act was passed in 1832, Attwood was elected to Parliament in December 1832, one of two Birmingham Members of Parliament (MPs) with Joshua Scholefield. He was an MP until around 1839. Only one in six men could vote at the time the act was passed.

There has been two statues made of Thomas Attwood.

The first was made in 1859 (around 3 years after his death in 1856) by the sculptor Peter Hollins. At one point the statue stood in Calthorpe Park in Edgbaston before later being moved to a park in Larches Green, Sparkbrook. It was there from 1974 until 2008. But it was regularly a target for graffiti and vandalism. It was removed from the park and was sent into storage at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre. Where it still remains unrestored.

The plinth is now outside with some other plinths at the Museum Collections Centre.

Seen here in 2012 with the graffiti tags still present.

Under the graffiti tags it reads "Thomas Attwood Founder of the Birmingham Political Union".

As of 2018 the statue itself is encased in a wooden crate, just outside of the Warehouse.

As you can see, the statue is in the same condition as it was when it was removed from the park in Sparkbrook in 2008. Graffiti tags all over, and one of the arms is missing.

Closer look at the head, and the condition of the statue looks worse for wear. Hopefully it will be restored one day and placed somewhere where the public could see it. Such as on the Harborne High Street?

The second statue was made more recently in 1993 and was placed on the steps of Chamberlain Square, not far from the Birmingham Town Hall and the now demolished Birmingham Central Library. It was removed to storage in November 2015 ahead of the demolition of the old library for the Paradise Birmingham redevelopment. The sculptors were Sioban Coppinger and Fiona Peever.

There also used to be a soapbox and pages on the steps with the words "Prosperity", "The Vote" and "Reform"

"Votes for All" and "Demand for Change"

"Full Employment" and "Free Trade".

You can find a blue plaque to Thomas Attwood at Crescent Tower. He lived on a house on that site on what is now the Civic Centre Estate (not far from Cambridge Street). The Birmingham Civic Society unveiled it in 1983.

 

About 30 plus years later another Birmingham MP, this time John Bright called for further political reform. He was famous for his battles to abolish the Corn Laws. He served as MP for Birmingham from 1858 until 1889. During this time he called for Parliamentary reform, and this led to the Reform Act 1867 (or the Second Reform Act).

The statue seen below is now at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery and was by Albert Joy and was made in 1888. John Bright Street near the Alexandrea Theatre was named in his honour.

All photos taken by Elliott Brown.

 

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Introducing

History & heritage
26 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Help protect our City's history & our City's heritage!

BirminghamWeAre has once again selected the Birmingham Museums Trust as the charity to benefit from its hugely popular Birmingham Gems calendar. Due to massive demand, our 2019 calendar wll be printed early in November 2018 and launched at a reception at Birmingham Council House.

Help promote and protect our city's history & heritage as a sponsor.

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Help protect our City's history & our City's heritage!




BirminghamWeAre has once again selected the Birmingham Museums Trust as the charity to benefit from its hugely popular Birmingham Gems calendar. Due to massive demand, our 2019 calendar wll be printed early in November 2018 and launched at a reception at Birmingham Council House.

Help promote and protect our city's history & heritage as a sponsor.


As a sponsor and/or partner of the 2019 Birmingham Gems calendar, you and your organisation will be showing just how important it is to protect our City's history and heritage, both now and in the future!

Your invaluable contribution will go towards the cost of printing over 4,000 calendars and the production of framed prints and canvases that will be auctioned on the day of the launch event, Over 200 distribution points (including shops, hotels, visitor attractions and businesses) will be used to ensure the Calendar reaches people who live and work in the City, as well as those visiting Birmingham. A text donation request of £5 will ensure the Museum Trust, as a charity, is well supported.

As a thank you, and in recognition of your valuable support as a sponsor, you will receive :

  • 100 calendars free for your own use and distribution. (Please note: The text donation reguest is £5 per calendar so this represents the equivalent of £500 in calendars)
  • Your company's logo and/or brand appearing prominently throughout the calendar on every diary page and your logo and description printed on the inside cover of the calendar (see our 2018 calendar below).
  • An invitation for you, your colleagues and invited guests to join us at a launch event, to be held at the Birmingham Council House on the 6th November 2018 (noon till 3pm).
  • Two tickets to an exclusive VIP opening of an event at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery (your choice of the high profile exhibitions during 2019)

Full social media coverage  of your involvement in the calendar will also confirm your passion for the City, its history and its heritage.

Join us as one of our valued and essential sponsors with a contribution (per sponsor) of £500. 

Contact us on 0121 410 5520 and ask for Debra Power, email Debra.Power@freetimepays.com or connect with us here.

View our 2018 Birmingham Gems Calendar for Charity

Inside cover containing sponsors and descriptions (example from 2018 calendar)

January 2018 diary page with sponsor logos and brands (example from 2018 calendar)

Here is the 2018 Birmingham Gems calendar in full :

Contact us on 0121 410 5520 and ask for Debra Power, email Debra.Power@freetimepays.com or connect with us here.

 

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News & Updates

Art, culture & creativity
25 Sep 2018 - Noushka Galley

House sharing tips

https://www.youtube.com/embed/AFrL-P7pgco

New video up with some tips about how to house share, while keeping friendships and saving money!

#MyChesterStory

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House sharing tips




New video up with some tips about how to house share, while keeping friendships and saving money!

#MyChesterStory


If you are short on time, you can copy and paste this list that recaps the points made in the video!

1) Don't be too hard on yourself

2) Be transparent with your house mates

3) List things that need doing for the move and update your contact details

4) Work out a routine to share chores and shopping with house mates

5) Make an online group chat

6) Set a budget for living costs

7) Negotiate a budget between house mates

8) Set a budget for the move itself

9) Save boxes and bags

10) Make time for rest and recovery

Do watch the video later when you get time as I go into each point listed below in more detail, and cover some instances where these tips will help out or avoid certain sticky situations most students face when house sharing!

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
22 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

Construction at Arena Central - September 2018

The start of the public space around Arena Central is seen here with the first part of the compressing wavy path from Centenary Square down to Holliday Street. More angles and perpectives of the whole site in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

 

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Construction at Arena Central - September 2018




The start of the public space around Arena Central is seen here with the first part of the compressing wavy path from Centenary Square down to Holliday Street. More angles and perpectives of the whole site in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

 


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
21 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square

Two Chamberlain Square has imposed itself on the scene at Paradise Birmingham and is continuing to rise, quite some square footage in this building! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square




Two Chamberlain Square has imposed itself on the scene at Paradise Birmingham and is continuing to rise, quite some square footage in this building! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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70 passion points

Gallery

Construction & regeneration
21 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Bank Tower Two

Progress update in photos of the 32 floor Bank Tower Two on Broad Street, now up to the 25th floor on the main structure.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Bank Tower Two




Progress update in photos of the 32 floor Bank Tower Two on Broad Street, now up to the 25th floor on the main structure.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Did you know?

History & heritage
21 Sep 2018 - Elliott Brown

J.R.R. Tolkien's Birmingham (inspiration for The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings)

J. R. R. Tolkien lived in the Birmingham area from when he was a child until he left for Oxford. Famous for writing The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings he lived in Sarehole, a hamlet now in Moseley, and later Edgbaston.

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J.R.R. Tolkien's Birmingham (inspiration for The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings)




J. R. R. Tolkien lived in the Birmingham area from when he was a child until he left for Oxford. Famous for writing The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings he lived in Sarehole, a hamlet now in Moseley, and later Edgbaston.


Sarehole 1896 - 1900

Tolkien lived with his mother Mabel and his younger brother Hilary from about 1896 to 1900 in house near the bottom of Wake Green Road in the hamlet of Sarehole (now part of Moseley). Nearby was Sarehole Mill and Moseley Bog which inspired him to create The Shire in The Hobbit. There is now a nearby country park that runs alongside the River Cole called The Shire Country Park.

Moseley Bog where JRR Tolkien and his younger brother would play as children. Inspiration for woods in The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings.

Tolkien lived in a property on Wake Green Road close to Moseley Bog and opposite Sarehole Mill. It is now Gracewell Cottages and is home to retired people. The Tolkien family lived at 264 Wake Green Road. Also known as No 5 Gracewell Cottages.

Originally made for Birmingham's 2013 display at the Chelsea Flower Show, these models of The Two Towers (Perrott's Folly and Edgbaston Waterworks Tower) were later moved to the garden area in front of the Library of Birmingham (before it opened in September 2013). A few years later in 2015, they were moved to an area close to Sarehole Mill where they are on permenant display.

Edgbaston 1900 - 1911

The Tolkien's later moved to Edgbaston. His mother placed the Tolkien boys in the guardianship of Father Francis Xavier Morgan of the Birmingham Oratory before her death. Inspiration for The Two Towers came from Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower.

The Birmingham Oratory seen on the Hagley Road in Edgbaston near Ladywood. JRR Tolkien was a parishioner and altar boy here from about 1902 to 1911. Not far from his homes at the time.

This was the home on Highfield Road in Edgbaston of Tolkien. He lived at No. 4 from 1910-11. He previously lived at Duchess Place in Ladywood from 1902 to about 1910. A modern building called Teleperformance House is on that site from the Hagley Road.

The Plough and Harrow pub on the Hagley Road in Edgbaston. Tolkien stayed here in June 1916 according to a blue plaque on the side of the building.

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News & Updates

Photography
20 Sep 2018 - Pete Davies

Sopwith Snipe c1918

The Sopwith Snipe replaced the Sopwith Camel and saw active service on the Western Front at the end of World War 1.

Part of the fabulous RAF100 event in Birmingham over the bank holiday.

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News & Updates

Art, culture & creativity
18 Sep 2018 - Noushka Galley

handmade with love

another throwback post

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handmade with love




another throwback post


I miss the days when I could play with clay and make random stuff to sell. But I am also grateful that I've gotten more focussed and am working hard to hone my illustration skills so each book that get's published is stronger and leaves a more impactful legacy than the last!

Get in touch using the details on my home page if you have a book in need of that extra special spark to bring it to life!

http://noushka7.wixsite.com/illustration

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