Inspiration

People & community
05 Oct 2018 - Chris Fletcher

'Why we chose to move to the Jewellery Quarter" - Chris and Em

In the first of our 'City Living' featured posts, new residents of the Jewellery Quarter, Chis and Em, tell us why they made the JQ move!

Take the full post to see why.

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'Why we chose to move to the Jewellery Quarter" - Chris and Em




In the first of our 'City Living' featured posts, new residents of the Jewellery Quarter, Chis and Em, tell us why they made the JQ move!

Take the full post to see why.


Moving to the city had never really occurred to us until early last year. We knew we didn't want to live in Tyseley anymore, Em in the house she had bought as a teenager and me, in a house that I loved because it was part of her, and us, but never truly mine. And the area was not for us anymore, a creative couple, a couple with no kids, a couple who are in their 40s but prefer to live a 20s lifestyle.

But where to move to? The city or the countryside? To another city? Another country?

Photography by Chris Fletcher

Deciding on our forever home is not a decision to be rushed, so instead we decided to make a less permanent move for now, one which would give us a taster of a lifestyle we craved without commitment. So where to move to short-term? We were unanimous - we wanted to try city centre living for a while, and we wanted the Jewellery Quarter to be our base.

"Urban reflections in JQ" by Chris Fletcher

Ask Em why she picked the Jewellery Quarter, and she'd probably reel off a list of bars and restaurants with gin and cocktail lists she intends to work through. And don't get me wrong, the proximity to some great craft beer and real ale pubs was also a factor in my decision, but the Jewellery Quarter is so much more than an eating and drinking hub. For me, as a photographer, it's the thought of having interesting content right outside my front door. Over the summer of 2018 I spent a great deal of time in the Jewellery Quarter, capturing the doors and windows of some of the magnificent buildings. There are stories behind those doors, hints to the history of an area which has played such an important part in Birmingham's industrial and manufacturing heritage. 

"Wonderful stories behind those windows and doors" by Chris Fletcher

Living in the Jewellery Quarter means that my day doesn't finish when I arrive home from work. I no longer have to shut the front door behind me and not surface until the morning because there is nowhere to go without effort. Em and I can now dissect our days in a coffee shop or bar, or just in our light and airy apartment. We can take our laptops and phones, and catch up with our social media, blogging and photo admin over a coffee or a pint (depending on the time of day). Meeting up with friends becomes easier, there's no more clock-watching to make sure we leave for the last train home. And if we ever get bored of our beloved Jewellery Quarter, the city centre itself is.just a 10 minute walk away.

"Downtown Birmingham" by Chris Fletcher

I can even get on to the canal network right at the end of our street - those who know my photography will know just how much I love to capture canals and their reflections.

"Canal walking through Birmingham" by Chris Fletcher

Our move to the Jewellery Quarter is - at the moment - only a temporary one but we may love the lifestyle so much that we decide to never leave. JQ, you have 12 months to convince us.

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45 passion points

Inspiration

Transport
04 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Diesel locomotives at the Tyseley Locomotive Works

It's not just steam locomotives to be found at a Tyseley Locomotive Works open day. They also have diesel engines in their collection, plus other diesel engines come to visit, or are there for maintenance / restoration as well.

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Diesel locomotives at the Tyseley Locomotive Works




It's not just steam locomotives to be found at a Tyseley Locomotive Works open day. They also have diesel engines in their collection, plus other diesel engines come to visit, or are there for maintenance / restoration as well.


In this post, we will show you what diesel locomotives are in Tyseley's collection, or which ones have visited on open days. Most of them were in service between the 1950s and 1980s before they were retired. Many were scrapped, some were preserved.

 

Their only operational Class 47 is 47773. Built 1964. BR Co-Co Class 47. Also known as D1755 The Queen Mother. Seen below in the engine shed at Tyseley. You can also see it from the walkway above. Although the best views of it was from both ends of the train.

Seen below in September 2016 was 47760 owned by West Coast Railways. It is now located at Carnforth.

37263 seen at the September 2016 open day. BR Co-Co Class 37. Built in 1965. It is currently located at the Telford Steam Railway.

40 118 seen at the September 2018 open day. BR 1Co-Co1 Class 40. Built 1961. Undergoing a major restoration.

50 033 seen at the September 2016 open day. It is named "Glorious". BR Co-Co Class 50. Built 1968. Glorious 'Hoover' is now undergoing a restoration at Kidderminster. It arrived at the Severn Valley Railway in late May 2018. They are hoping to get it ready for the gala marking 50 years of Class 50s.

A visitor to the Tyseley Locomotive Works in April 2018 was 56301. Class 56. Now owned by the Class 56 Group. Built sometime between 1976 and 1984. It was delivered to Tyseley by lorry propably for an open day that spring.

13029 (08021) from the area where you can watch steam trains going up the line nearby. BR 0-6-0 Class 08. Built 1953.

On open days they have one train at Tyseley Warwick Road with a Buffet Car. In September 2016 that was behind The Flying Scotsman. This time in September 2018 the Buffet Car was close to the buffer. There was about four Class 50 trains behind.

Now a look at the four visiting Class 50 diesel locomotives that were at Tyseley Warwick Road behind the buffet car.

 

50 006 Neptune. D406. Built 1968. Named in 1978. The first Class 50 to be refurbished. The original Neptune was scrapped in 1988. It is actually 50 007 Hercules (that number / name pair could be seen on from the other platform).

50 007 Hercules. D407. Built 1968. Named 1978. Renamed to Sir Edward Elgar in 1984. Renamed back to Hercules in 2014. Now owned by the Class 50 Alliance. 50 006 Neptune is on the other side of the train.

50 011 Centurion.  D411. Built 1968. Named 1978. First Class 50 to be withdrawn. The original Centurion was scrapped in 1992. It is actually 50 049 Defiance (that number / name pair could be seen from the other platform).

50 049 Defiance.  D449. Built 1968. Named 1978. Now owned by the Class 50 Alliance. 50 011 Centurion is on the other side of the train.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown at the September 2016 and September 2018 open days at the Tyseley Locomotive Works.

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50 passion points

Gallery

Construction & regeneration
03 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley

Construction at Arena Central - September 2018

Here's a nice reflection of the Library of Birmingham in One Centenary Square, the new HSBC UK headquarters, but it's Dandara that is now dominating the site. See the photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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Construction at Arena Central - September 2018




Here's a nice reflection of the Library of Birmingham in One Centenary Square, the new HSBC UK headquarters, but it's Dandara that is now dominating the site. See the photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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50 passion points

Gallery

Construction & regeneration
01 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square

Construction at Paradise Birmingham is accelerating with Two Chamberlain Square over two thirds up with it's main structure. View the full post for more.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square




Construction at Paradise Birmingham is accelerating with Two Chamberlain Square over two thirds up with it's main structure. View the full post for more.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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60 passion points

Inspiration

Transport
01 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Tyseley Locomotive Works 50th Anniversary

The 50th Anniversary of the Tyseley Locomotive Works was in late September 2018. There are regular open days held at Tyseley ever year. The site is run by Vintage Trains who restores old steam locomotives, and sometimes has them on the national network such as the Shakespeare Express.

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Tyseley Locomotive Works 50th Anniversary




The 50th Anniversary of the Tyseley Locomotive Works was in late September 2018. There are regular open days held at Tyseley ever year. The site is run by Vintage Trains who restores old steam locomotives, and sometimes has them on the national network such as the Shakespeare Express.


Originally built in 1908 as the Great Western Railway's Tyseley depot, Vintage Trains has been operating here since the mid to late 1960s restoring old steam locomotives. At one point the Tyseley Locomotive Works was known as the Birmingham Railway Museum, but the site is now only open to the public on certain open days during each year. They also attract vintage cars, traction engines and model railway clubs to the site. In September 2016, the famous Flying Scotsman paid a visit to Tyseley and Birmingham.

Part of the site is now the West Midlands Railway Diesel Multiple-Unit Depot (formerly London Midland / Central Trains / British Rail), but here we are focussing on the vintage trains part of the site.

You will find that a lot of the trains are giving off steam (especially the steam locomotives on site). Most of the main loco's are positioned around the turntable in the middle.

The turntable seen in 2016.

No 1. Called Percy. Peckett and Sons 0-4-0ST. Lined Maroon. Built 1942.

5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe. GWR 4-6-0 4073 Castle Class. BR Green, Early Emblem. Built 1936.

Seen on the turntable in September 2018 the recently restored 7029 Clun Castle. GWR 4-6-0 4073 Castle Class. BR Green, Late Crest. Built 1950.

Seen in September 2016. 4965 Rood Ashton Hall. GWR 4-6-0 49xx Hall Class. GWR Green. Built 1931.

Seen during September 2016 around the turntable. 5593 Kolhapur. 5XP Jubilee. Built in 1934. Now on display waiting a restoration.

Seen on the open day of September 2018. 45596 Bahamas. LMS 4-6-0 5XP Jubilee. Built 1935. Used to be at the National Railway Museum in York. Moved to the Tyseley Locomotive Works in 2013 for restoration. Bahamas Locomotive Society have owned it since 1967.

9600 is used on open days to pull the carriages so visitors can enjoy a train ride. It was not used in September 2018 (but was in September 2016). GWR 0-6-0PT 57xx Class. Built 1945.

L94 London Transport seen pulling carriages with visitors enjoying a train ride up and down the line. You get on at Tyseley Warwick Road if you have tickets. Seen September 2018. GWR 0-6-0PT 57xx Class.Built 1930. Used on the London Underground from 1959 to 1971.

Something you don't normally see much at Tyseley is 60103 The Flying Scotsman. It visited Birmingham and the Midlands in September 2016, and was at Tyseley Warwick Road for the open day. It also went on the Severn Valley Railway at the time, and you could also see it on the Snow Hill lines. It had come down from the National Railway Museum in York, and was making a nationwide tour after a decade long restoration of the famous engine!

During the open day visits, you get a chance to see what locomotives that are undergoing restoration, or what they are building here.

In September 2016, 7029 Clun Castle was undergoing a full restoration. It was completed by October 2017. See the photo above of it on the turntable during the September 2018 open day.

Another engine was seen in the same spot in September 2018 undergoing a restoration / rebuild. 4936 Kinlet Hall can be seen having an overhaul to the left. It was bought in 1981 by the Kinlet Hall Locomotive Company. It had operated on various heritage railways, first restoration completed at Tyseley in 1996. It needed a second restoration from summer 2016, and is now undergoing a complete overhaul. While 71000 The Impossible Dream was still to the right. More on that engine below.

No 670 seen in September 2016. This was a completely new steam locomotive. They started to build it in 1986! But as of 2018 it has never been finished! It is a LNWR Bloomer Class 2-2-2 replica. Was 90% completed by 1990.

A close up look at The Impossible Dream 71000 The Duke of Gloucester. Built in 1954. BR Standard Class 8 4-6-2. Seen at the September 2018 open day, it is still under going restoration. They need donations to help restore it. A long way to go.

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40 passion points

Introducing

People & community
30 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

JQwithYou - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!

With a reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome the Jewellery Quarter as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about JQ. Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is the Jewellery Quarter!

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JQwithYou - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!




With a reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome the Jewellery Quarter as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about JQ. Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is the Jewellery Quarter!


JQwithYou is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact. JQwithYou is connected to BirminghamWeAre, the City's Community of Passion to deliver a massive reach and maximise the exposure of JQ passion.

FreeTimePays is delighted to provide this unique collaborative digital space for people who are passionate about the Jewellery Quarter and want to do whatever they can to help promote their community.

At JQwithYou, we help connect people where passions are shared; we give people FREE access to their very own digital space where they can promote their passion; and we recognise people for the contributions they make through the allocation of Passion Points. Interested? Connect with us HERE.

The reach of FreeTimePays is huge and is growing with Communities of Passion being rolled out across the UK. 

Companies and organisations keen to support People with Passion play an essential role and we have a range of partnership, sponsorship and advertising packages available.

We can even go as far as to set groups and networks up with their own portal so they can grow their own branded Community of Passion linked to their own website or social media account.

View our Partnership arrangements or connect with us HERE.

Now let's show you what you get with FreeTimePays. 

FreeTimePays

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Passport, Community Workspace and Community Matchmaker. Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

FreeTimePays is here for people who really want to become involved in their community or with their particular passion and for those people who are really serious about making a difference. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the great ideas with those who have the potential to turn an idea into something that really does make a difference.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways.

They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the opportunity to take up offers and win prizes.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or project.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share in building evidence, acquiring knowledge and developing plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of facilities and tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is MAKING A DIFFERENCE. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the GREAT IDEAS with those who have the potential to turn an IDEA into something that really does MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Matchmaker is where the dreamers can join with the dream makers – with those who are more than happy to put their support, their resources, their connections, and their wealth of experience behind the idea and behind the passionate people responsible for coming up with the idea.

These are the community drivers, the investors, the philanthropists, the funders of great initiatives, the Lottery, and those from local government and the public sector who are responsible for the provision of public services.

These are the people and the organisations who are in positions of making things happen for those who are passionate and inspired to want to make a difference.

For more detail on what is provided by FreeTimePays connect HERE.

JQwithYou

JQwithYou will grow as a shared space for the many individuals, communities and businesses that will want to connect and share in their passion for their community.

Their work, their ideas and their proposals can be pulled together in the one collaborative space giving them access to a huge resource bank for sharing images, documents and web links. 

In this space people can chat in a secure environment if they wish; they can set up and promote events; or they can communicate with any of the FreeTimePays Communities through creating and submitting posts.

We would be delighted to tell you more.

Contact Jonathan Bostock at jonathan.bostock@freetimepays.com or connect HERE with FreeTimePays for more information on sharing your passion for the Jewellery Quarter.

 

 

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40 passion points

Introducing

People & community
29 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Are you passionate about the Jewellery Quarter? Join Us!

JQwithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change & positive social impact in the JQ.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for the Jewellery Quarter and connect with people who share their passion.

View our post.

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Are you passionate about the Jewellery Quarter? Join Us!




JQwithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change & positive social impact in the JQ.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for the Jewellery Quarter and connect with people who share their passion.

View our post.

JQwithYou is all about engaging people in the passion that is the Jewellery Quarter.

JQwithYou is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

Connect with us HERE and take your passion to the next level.

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40 passion points

Gallery

Construction & regeneration
29 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square

There is a section of the building that can now be photographed as finished and some architectural detail shots become possible, more in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of One Chamberlain Square




There is a section of the building that can now be photographed as finished and some architectural detail shots become possible, more in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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70 passion points

Introducing

People & community
28 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Free Time really does pay for people with passion in Birmingham!

BirminghamWeAre is the first Community of Passion to be given access to a 'created here in Birmingham' digital space devoted to the delivery of social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is a unique collaborative environment and social media channel that connects, promotes and rewards people with passion.

Take the full post to find out more. 

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Free Time really does pay for people with passion in Birmingham!




BirminghamWeAre is the first Community of Passion to be given access to a 'created here in Birmingham' digital space devoted to the delivery of social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is a unique collaborative environment and social media channel that connects, promotes and rewards people with passion.

Take the full post to find out more. 


It is only right that people should feel proud of where they live and feel a part of the community with whom they share that space.

In the case of Birmingham, people should be rightly proud of their City and their Community. However, this can only realistically happen if people feel part of a wider vision and part of something which they can not only have a say about but which they can personally influence, contribute to and benefit from.

That is exactly why FreeTimePays was built.

People also have passion!

How many times do we hear people refer to their passion by saying "my passion is ...." or "I am passionate about ...".

It is our assertion and belief that the vast majority of people have a passion or have something they are passionate about.  It could be something they enjoy participating in, something they follow as a hobby, or something they really aspire to become, achieve or pursue as a career.

With help, direction and support, passions can be nurtured and dreams can be realised for the benefit of so many people.

The purpose behind the FreeTimePays build has been to provide a digital space for people who want to create impact (socially and economically), a space for people who want to make a difference, and a space where people can realise their dreams and aspirations – we call this, the delivery of real passion!

The potential rewards of a digital space that people can use, either individually or collectively, in shaping their ideas, promoting their passion and collectively creating impact are huge!

The aims and goals of those behind this unique digital platform are rightly ambitious.

However, the desired outcome and the potential impact are also extremely realistic!

What is BirminghamWeAre?

BirminghamWeAre is a Community of Passion that is dedicated to engaging, involving, but (most importantly) supporting the people of Birmingham in shared passion. Via a portal, this community has been given complete access to use FreeTimePays technology for creating impact.

There is no other digitally connected community comparable to BirminghamWeAre.

Back in 2016, at the time FreeTimePays digital space was being built, an account was set up on twitter called BirminghamWeAre.

The purpose of using an existing social media channel was to introduce people to the difference they can make and the positive impact they can have on their city and on their community and how such impact can be reflected through rewards and recognition.

In just a few years, BirminghamWeAre has attracted not just a large following, but a following that consists of people who really do want to get involved and help make a difference.

The BirminghamWeAre twitter account has been an excellent channel for identifying #PeoplewithPassion who share #BirminghamPassion. The twitter account alone now delivers 0.5 million impressions every month and is growing fast.

This and other social media accounts set up at that time have all helped to identify people who really do want to make a difference, people who have some great ideas and people who can, collectively and individually, create impact for the benefit of themselves, their community and their City.

Over 30 passions that can help shape the City

At BirminghamWeAre, we have identified over 30 passions that, if followed, supported and pursued, can have a direct and positive influence on the City and for Community. 

These are passions that are not just important to people who live in, work in and/or visit Birmingham, they are passions that if supported and nurtured will help the City in its drive for continued economic growth and prosperity. 

The potential for delivering positive social impact is just as great. These are all passions that can have a direct impact on community and on the effective inclusion and cohesion of people that collectively make up and represent the City of Birmingham.

So what now?

Passion by passion and neighbourhood by neighbourhood, we will look to develop constructive partnerships. These partnerships will include individuals, community champions, business leaders and local government - people and stakeholders who collectively have an interest in driving passion to create positive social impact.

The make-up of FreeTimePays

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Workspace, Community Matchmaker and Community Passport.  Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways. They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the recognition for the impact they are having and the difference they are making.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or initiative.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share the same space in order to build evidence, acquire knowledge and develop plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of applications and engagement tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

This space is where content is pulled together and posts created for submission across multiple sites in order to reach a wide, diverse, but also, well targeted audience.  

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is MAKING A DIFFERENCE. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the GREAT IDEAS with those who have the potential to turn an IDEA into something that really does MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Further details:

Connect with us HERE and let's discuss your passion. 

 

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40 passion points

Did you know?

Civic pride
27 Sep 2018 - Elliott Brown

Thomas Attwood: Birmingham's first Member of Parliament

Did you know that Birmingham's first MP was Thomas Attwood from 1832 to 1840. There has been two statues honouring him in Birmingham, one dated 1859 and the other more recently in 1993. He lobbied for a Reform Bill and he founded the Birmingham Politcal Union at the end of 1829.

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Thomas Attwood: Birmingham's first Member of Parliament




Did you know that Birmingham's first MP was Thomas Attwood from 1832 to 1840. There has been two statues honouring him in Birmingham, one dated 1859 and the other more recently in 1993. He lobbied for a Reform Bill and he founded the Birmingham Politcal Union at the end of 1829.


Before 1832, Birmingham didn't have any represenation in Parliament. A Birmingham Banker called Thomas Attwood founded the Birmingham Political Union in 1829.

Portrait of Thomas Attwood seen at the Birmingham History Galleries at the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

It called for extending voting to the working class and redistributing suffrage rights. A Reform Bill of this kind went to Parliament in 1831, before the passing of the 1832 Reform Act.

In May 1832, The Birmingham Political Union met at New Hall Hill where about 200,000 people gathered calling for political reform.

Painting below seen at the Birmingham History Galleries painted by Benjamin Haydon.

After the Reform Act was passed in 1832, Attwood was elected to Parliament in December 1832, one of two Birmingham Members of Parliament (MPs) with Joshua Scholefield. He was an MP until around 1839. Only one in six men could vote at the time the act was passed.

There has been two statues made of Thomas Attwood.

The first was made in 1859 (around 3 years after his death in 1856) by the sculptor Peter Hollins. At one point the statue stood in Calthorpe Park in Edgbaston before later being moved to a park in Larches Green, Sparkbrook. It was there from 1974 until 2008. But it was regularly a target for graffiti and vandalism. It was removed from the park and was sent into storage at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre. Where it still remains unrestored.

The plinth is now outside with some other plinths at the Museum Collections Centre.

Seen here in 2012 with the graffiti tags still present.

Under the graffiti tags it reads "Thomas Attwood Founder of the Birmingham Political Union".

As of 2018 the statue itself is encased in a wooden crate, just outside of the Warehouse.

As you can see, the statue is in the same condition as it was when it was removed from the park in Sparkbrook in 2008. Graffiti tags all over, and one of the arms is missing.

Closer look at the head, and the condition of the statue looks worse for wear. Hopefully it will be restored one day and placed somewhere where the public could see it. Such as on the Harborne High Street?

The second statue was made more recently in 1993 and was placed on the steps of Chamberlain Square, not far from the Birmingham Town Hall and the now demolished Birmingham Central Library. It was removed to storage in November 2015 ahead of the demolition of the old library for the Paradise Birmingham redevelopment. The sculptors were Sioban Coppinger and Fiona Peever.

There also used to be a soapbox and pages on the steps with the words "Prosperity", "The Vote" and "Reform"

"Votes for All" and "Demand for Change"

"Full Employment" and "Free Trade".

You can find a blue plaque to Thomas Attwood at Crescent Tower. He lived on a house on that site on what is now the Civic Centre Estate (not far from Cambridge Street). The Birmingham Civic Society unveiled it in 1983.

 

About 30 plus years later another Birmingham MP, this time John Bright called for further political reform. He was famous for his battles to abolish the Corn Laws. He served as MP for Birmingham from 1858 until 1889. During this time he called for Parliamentary reform, and this led to the Reform Act 1867 (or the Second Reform Act).

The statue seen below is now at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery and was by Albert Joy and was made in 1888. John Bright Street near the Alexandrea Theatre was named in his honour.

All photos taken by Elliott Brown.

 

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50 passion points

Introducing

History & heritage
26 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Help protect our City's history & our City's heritage!

BirminghamWeAre has once again selected the Birmingham Museums Trust as the charity to benefit from its hugely popular Birmingham Gems calendar. Due to massive demand, our 2019 calendar wll be printed early in November 2018 and launched at a reception at Birmingham Council House.

Help promote and protect our city's history & heritage as a sponsor.

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Help protect our City's history & our City's heritage!




BirminghamWeAre has once again selected the Birmingham Museums Trust as the charity to benefit from its hugely popular Birmingham Gems calendar. Due to massive demand, our 2019 calendar wll be printed early in November 2018 and launched at a reception at Birmingham Council House.

Help promote and protect our city's history & heritage as a sponsor.


As a sponsor and/or partner of the 2019 Birmingham Gems calendar, you and your organisation will be showing just how important it is to protect our City's history and heritage, both now and in the future!

Your invaluable contribution will go towards the cost of printing over 4,000 calendars and the production of framed prints and canvases that will be auctioned on the day of the launch event, Over 200 distribution points (including shops, hotels, visitor attractions and businesses) will be used to ensure the Calendar reaches people who live and work in the City, as well as those visiting Birmingham. A text donation request of £5 will ensure the Museum Trust, as a charity, is well supported.

As a thank you, and in recognition of your valuable support as a sponsor, you will receive :

  • 100 calendars free for your own use and distribution. (Please note: The text donation reguest is £5 per calendar so this represents the equivalent of £500 in calendars)
  • Your company's logo and/or brand appearing prominently throughout the calendar on every diary page and your logo and description printed on the inside cover of the calendar (see our 2018 calendar below).
  • An invitation for you, your colleagues and invited guests to join us at a launch event, to be held at the Birmingham Council House on the 6th November 2018 (noon till 3pm).
  • Two tickets to an exclusive VIP opening of an event at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery (your choice of the high profile exhibitions during 2019)

Full social media coverage  of your involvement in the calendar will also confirm your passion for the City, its history and its heritage.

Join us as one of our valued and essential sponsors with a contribution (per sponsor) of £500. 

Contact us on 0121 410 5520 and ask for Debra Power, email Debra.Power@freetimepays.com or connect with us here.

View our 2018 Birmingham Gems Calendar for Charity

Inside cover containing sponsors and descriptions (example from 2018 calendar)

January 2018 diary page with sponsor logos and brands (example from 2018 calendar)

Here is the 2018 Birmingham Gems calendar in full :

Contact us on 0121 410 5520 and ask for Debra Power, email Debra.Power@freetimepays.com or connect with us here.

 

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News & Updates

Art, culture & creativity
25 Sep 2018 - Noushka Galley

House sharing tips

https://www.youtube.com/embed/AFrL-P7pgco

New video up with some tips about how to house share, while keeping friendships and saving money!

#MyChesterStory

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House sharing tips




New video up with some tips about how to house share, while keeping friendships and saving money!

#MyChesterStory


If you are short on time, you can copy and paste this list that recaps the points made in the video!

1) Don't be too hard on yourself

2) Be transparent with your house mates

3) List things that need doing for the move and update your contact details

4) Work out a routine to share chores and shopping with house mates

5) Make an online group chat

6) Set a budget for living costs

7) Negotiate a budget between house mates

8) Set a budget for the move itself

9) Save boxes and bags

10) Make time for rest and recovery

Do watch the video later when you get time as I go into each point listed below in more detail, and cover some instances where these tips will help out or avoid certain sticky situations most students face when house sharing!

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
22 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

Construction at Arena Central - September 2018

The start of the public space around Arena Central is seen here with the first part of the compressing wavy path from Centenary Square down to Holliday Street. More angles and perpectives of the whole site in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

 

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Construction at Arena Central - September 2018




The start of the public space around Arena Central is seen here with the first part of the compressing wavy path from Centenary Square down to Holliday Street. More angles and perpectives of the whole site in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

 


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Construction & regeneration
21 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square

Two Chamberlain Square has imposed itself on the scene at Paradise Birmingham and is continuing to rise, quite some square footage in this building! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square




Two Chamberlain Square has imposed itself on the scene at Paradise Birmingham and is continuing to rise, quite some square footage in this building! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
21 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Bank Tower Two

Progress update in photos of the 32 floor Bank Tower Two on Broad Street, now up to the 25th floor on the main structure.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Bank Tower Two




Progress update in photos of the 32 floor Bank Tower Two on Broad Street, now up to the 25th floor on the main structure.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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History & heritage
21 Sep 2018 - Elliott Brown

J.R.R. Tolkien's Birmingham (inspiration for The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings)

J. R. R. Tolkien lived in the Birmingham area from when he was a child until he left for Oxford. Famous for writing The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings he lived in Sarehole, a hamlet now in Moseley, and later Edgbaston.

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J.R.R. Tolkien's Birmingham (inspiration for The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings)




J. R. R. Tolkien lived in the Birmingham area from when he was a child until he left for Oxford. Famous for writing The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings he lived in Sarehole, a hamlet now in Moseley, and later Edgbaston.


Sarehole 1896 - 1900

Tolkien lived with his mother Mabel and his younger brother Hilary from about 1896 to 1900 in house near the bottom of Wake Green Road in the hamlet of Sarehole (now part of Moseley). Nearby was Sarehole Mill and Moseley Bog which inspired him to create The Shire in The Hobbit. There is now a nearby country park that runs alongside the River Cole called The Shire Country Park.

Moseley Bog where JRR Tolkien and his younger brother would play as children. Inspiration for woods in The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings.

Tolkien lived in a property on Wake Green Road close to Moseley Bog and opposite Sarehole Mill. It is now Gracewell Cottages and is home to retired people. The Tolkien family lived at 264 Wake Green Road. Also known as No 5 Gracewell Cottages.

Originally made for Birmingham's 2013 display at the Chelsea Flower Show, these models of The Two Towers (Perrott's Folly and Edgbaston Waterworks Tower) were later moved to the garden area in front of the Library of Birmingham (before it opened in September 2013). A few years later in 2015, they were moved to an area close to Sarehole Mill where they are on permenant display.

Edgbaston 1900 - 1911

The Tolkien's later moved to Edgbaston. His mother placed the Tolkien boys in the guardianship of Father Francis Xavier Morgan of the Birmingham Oratory before her death. Inspiration for The Two Towers came from Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower.

The Birmingham Oratory seen on the Hagley Road in Edgbaston near Ladywood. JRR Tolkien was a parishioner and altar boy here from about 1902 to 1911. Not far from his homes at the time.

This was the home on Highfield Road in Edgbaston of Tolkien. He lived at No. 4 from 1910-11. He previously lived at Duchess Place in Ladywood from 1902 to about 1910. A modern building called Teleperformance House is on that site from the Hagley Road.

The Plough and Harrow pub on the Hagley Road in Edgbaston. Tolkien stayed here in June 1916 according to a blue plaque on the side of the building.

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News & Updates

Photography
20 Sep 2018 - Pete Davies

Sopwith Snipe c1918

The Sopwith Snipe replaced the Sopwith Camel and saw active service on the Western Front at the end of World War 1.

Part of the fabulous RAF100 event in Birmingham over the bank holiday.

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News & Updates

Art, culture & creativity
18 Sep 2018 - Noushka Galley

handmade with love

another throwback post

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handmade with love




another throwback post


I miss the days when I could play with clay and make random stuff to sell. But I am also grateful that I've gotten more focussed and am working hard to hone my illustration skills so each book that get's published is stronger and leaves a more impactful legacy than the last!

Get in touch using the details on my home page if you have a book in need of that extra special spark to bring it to life!

http://noushka7.wixsite.com/illustration

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Fundraising & charity
17 Sep 2018 - Noushka Galley

Sensory Processing

A look back at some of the autism questions groups have raised and I contributed my answers to. Do share and comment if the information below is interesting and helpful to yourself or people you may know!

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Sensory Processing




A look back at some of the autism questions groups have raised and I contributed my answers to. Do share and comment if the information below is interesting and helpful to yourself or people you may know!


Sight

Because I am fairly alert and observant I am very aware of what I see and any changes to my sight, which helps my opticians keep up to date. I also use the computer a lot and can work using a very dimmed backlight. Bright or florescent light and colours reduce my appetite, especially when they are paired with a contrasting or similar colour (e.g. red and gray, or red and florescent pink). I am careful about my own clothes and have to think of polite comments when someone shows me a bright outfit and asks my opinion! I am much better with sparkly things than when I was a child and I had an absolute phobia of the colour red. I don’t mind it as much but neon colours still make my eyes ache…

I also have a thin retena so blood-cells in my eye create a static tv effect on my vision. It is very noticeable on plain surfaces, and in the dark. It’s less noticable when I look at grass and gravel.

 

Sound

I bring earplugs just in case but this sense fluctuates depending on how tired or anxious I am. Sometimes my state can affect how sensitive I am, but other times noisy environments drain me or set me on edge. I do counting and close my eyes to reduce visual sensory stress but sometimes I still end up stimming after a tiring day, until I get to a quieter place.

 

Taste

I am actually hyposensitive to taste and don’t make a great connoisseur for food and drink. I also don’t like gum as the sound and texture is distracting and outweigh the benefit of the taste. I do however have a low tolerance for spicy food and even Chinese-style curry can be too hot for my pallet!

 

Smell

Smell can really affect my appetite and the first thing I experience when I am run down is a smell in the back of my throat. It might be psychological, as it doesn’t affect my actual breath. I also smell sewage much stronger than other people and I have resorted to using a scarf or mask (like in East Asia) to reduce it a bit. I keep body spray in my bag in case it turns out to me. It can come in useful when I am the first to smell gas leaks.

 

Touch

Weirdly enough, I have to wash and dry my hands half way through washing up as I don’t like my hands to stay soapy or wet for more than 10 minutes. If I don’t do this, my co-ordination gets really bad and my focus wavers so I end up almost breaking things. I keep hand cream in my bag in case I handle dusty stock at the shop I volunteer at, and also hand wipes for when I eat food, or touch something slimy or sticky by accident. My face gets very oily when I’m even slightly warm so wipes a gentle way of drying my face without having to use loads of spot creams which can dry skin out too much with daily use.

 

Senses “blending”

Sound if at a high pitch or loud enough volume can have a metallic flavour for the duration but doesn’t leave an after-taste so I know it is a psychological experience. In some cases I also get phantosmia triggered by certain colours or stressful circumstances. These aren’t entirely to do with sensory input, but it does affect my sense of smell and thought it was worth mentioning.

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Inspiration

History & heritage
17 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Inspirational day at Highbury Hall - well done Trustees and Volunteers of Chamberlain Highbury Trust!

Wonderful Open Day at Highbury Hall showed just what people with passion to protect Birmingham's great history & heritage can achieve.

Because of the time, passion & energy put in by trustees and volunteers, we can all enjoy the very best of our history & heritage.

Take the full post for a some great photography courtesy Daniel and Elliott.

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Inspirational day at Highbury Hall - well done Trustees and Volunteers of Chamberlain Highbury Trust!




Wonderful Open Day at Highbury Hall showed just what people with passion to protect Birmingham's great history & heritage can achieve.

Because of the time, passion & energy put in by trustees and volunteers, we can all enjoy the very best of our history & heritage.

Take the full post for a some great photography courtesy Daniel and Elliott.


Photography courtesy Daniel Sturley and Elliott Brown.

Join our people with passion here and promote your passion with us at BirminghamWeAre.

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Inspiration

History & heritage
17 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Inspired to go back in time with King's Heath Local History Society!

At the Highbury Hall open day, we were blown away by the passion on display and the time and effort put in by people with passion. 

In particular, we were amazed by the wonderful collection of photos and great 'did you know' facts held by the King's Heath Local History Society.

We look forward to being able to showcase more of this great heritage.

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
16 Sep 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square

There are many more ceramic stripes installed on the building now, 12 photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of One Chamberlain Square




There are many more ceramic stripes installed on the building now, 12 photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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News & Updates

Construction & regeneration
12 Sep 2018 - FreeTimePays

Proposals for Commonwealth Games (2022) Athletes Village in Perry Barr, Birmingham

The proposed multi-million pound village for the Games will accommodate up to 6,800 athletes and officials. Here are the images for the plans as prepared by Birmingham City Council which are out for consultation till 13th September.

Take the full post and links. 

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Proposals for Commonwealth Games (2022) Athletes Village in Perry Barr, Birmingham




The proposed multi-million pound village for the Games will accommodate up to 6,800 athletes and officials. Here are the images for the plans as prepared by Birmingham City Council which are out for consultation till 13th September.

Take the full post and links. 


11 proposed plots making up the Athletes Village for the Commonwealth Games 2022 in Birmingham. Village to be located at Perry Barr. 

Overview of Athletes Village.  Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 1. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 2. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 3. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 4. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 5. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 6. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 7. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 8. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 9. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 10. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 10. Athletes Village (internal). Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plot 11. Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

Plots making up the application for Athletes Village. Copyright Birmingham City Council

See 2022withYou for more on the Commonwealth Games plans and developments. To get involved as someone who is passionate about the Games and what it offers Birmingham and community, connect with us here.

 

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Architecture
12 Sep 2018 - Elliott Brown

Thomas Telford: A Tale of Three Bridges (including Galton Bridge in Smethwick)

Here we take a look at the 18th century engineer Thomas Telford and some of the bridges that he designed. Along the Birmingham Canal Navigations New Main Line, he designed the Galton Bridge in Smethwick. In North Wales two suspension bridges at Conwy and Menai on the road to Holyhead.

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Thomas Telford: A Tale of Three Bridges (including Galton Bridge in Smethwick)




Here we take a look at the 18th century engineer Thomas Telford and some of the bridges that he designed. Along the Birmingham Canal Navigations New Main Line, he designed the Galton Bridge in Smethwick. In North Wales two suspension bridges at Conwy and Menai on the road to Holyhead.


Galton Bridge

The bridge was built in Smethwick on the Birmingham Canal Navigations New Main Line carrying the Roebuck Lane in 1829, and was named after Samuel Galton a member of the Lunar Society. . When it was built, it's single span of 151 feet (46 metres) was the highest in the world. It used to be a road bridge, but it now only carries pedestrians. It is now a Grade I listed building. Smethwick Galton Bridge Station nearby (opened in 1995) was named after it.

This view is seen shortly after getting off a train on the Snow Hill lines from Birmingham on the High Level of Smethwick Galton Bridge Station.

Down on the Birmingham Canal Navigations New Main Line (Birmingham Level), this view of the Galton Bridge is towards the Galton Tunnel.

The best views from canal level normally have the 1829 bridge with the 1995 railway station behind it.

Quite an impressive view. But with all of Telford's bridges covered here, railway bridges were later built beside. The station only came when the Jewellery Line opened in 1995. The nearby Smethwick West Station closed in 1996 (platforms are still visible if you are on a train to or from Stourbridge Junction).

A look at Roebuck Lane both directions on the Galton Bridge in Smethwick.

It's time to see what Thomas Telford was up to in North Wales. He built two suspension bridges on the A5 road from Chester to Holyhead. It allowed road traffic from 1826 to get from London to Holyhead (on Anglesey) then to get a ferry to Dublin in Ireland.

The problem was crossing the River Conwy in Conwy and the Menai Strait between Gwynedd (near Bangor) and Anglesey (near what is now Menai Bridge Town).

Conwy Suspension Bridge

The bridge was built to cross the River Conwy in Conwy County Borough, and was built close to Conwy Castle. The bridge designed by Thomas Telford was built from 1822 to 1826. The bridge is 99.5 metres long (326 ft). Road traffic used it from 1826 to 1958 when it was replaced by the nearby Conwy Bridge. A Toll House was at one end where tolls were collected. The bridge was designed to match the castle with castellated towers. It closed to road traffic in 1958, and the National Trust owned it from 1965. The bridge is Grade I listed.

The bridge has been closed to road traffic since 1958, only pedestrians cross it now. Got it to myself at one point during my visit!

The towers were built in a castellated form to match with Conwy Castle.

The Toll House at the other end of the Conwy Suspension Bridge. It has been laid out as if it was 1891 by the National Trust. Vehicles would have to stop here and pay their tolls (usually horse and cart, people with mules, bicylcles etc). By the mid 20th century this caused traffic jams into Conwy, and a new bridge was built and opened nearby in 1958.

Alongside Telford's bridge is the 1848 Conwy Tubular Bridge by Robert Stephenson. Also castallated. This view to Conwy Castle.

It carries the North Wales Coast Line railway, on this section between Llandudno Junction and Conwy Station. Then onto Anglesey via the Britannia Bridge and onto Holyhead.

 

Menai Suspension Bridge

The bridge crosses the Menai Strait from the Gwynedd side (close to Bangor) to the Isle of Anglesey (near Menai Bridge Town known in Welsh as Porthaethwy). The bridge spans 176 metres (577 ft). It was completed in 1826 and is still used by road traffic. Construction of the bridge began in 1819. The deck of the bridge was later strengthed in 1840 by W. A. Provis. And the wooden surface replaced by a steel surface in 1893 by Sir Benjamin Baker. In 1999 the bridge was closed for a month to allow for resurfacing and strenghen the structure. There is pedestrian walkways on both sides of the bridge. Buses both single and double decker are able to cross the bridge, but have to slow down under the arched towers.

Crossing the bridge towards Anglesey. It's on the A5 to Holyhead. But you can also use the A55 North Wales Expressway over the Britannia Bridge instead (faster).

The bridge is ok for small buses like this one.

Bigger buses, single or double deckers normally struggle when they head under the towers.

Some buses go to the nearby City of Bangor (to the right of this location)

It's a long way down to the Menai Strait. Walking on either side of the bridge, you certainly feel a bit of vertigo. Best to not be scared of heights.

All photos taken by Elliott Brown

 

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Environment & green spaces
12 Sep 2018 - Debra Power

Christine Wright - A winner of best captured photograph taken at the Botanical Gardens (A Birmingham Gem)

Well done Christine! for winning the IGers Birmingham Competition for photgraphy taken at the Botanical Gardens, 'A Birmingham Gem', with nearly 500 entrants, a difficult task for the Botanical Gardens to select just 2 winners along with Christine is also winner photographer Dan Matthews.

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Christine Wright - A winner of best captured photograph taken at the Botanical Gardens (A Birmingham Gem)




Well done Christine! for winning the IGers Birmingham Competition for photgraphy taken at the Botanical Gardens, 'A Birmingham Gem', with nearly 500 entrants, a difficult task for the Botanical Gardens to select just 2 winners along with Christine is also winner photographer Dan Matthews.


Sunset over the glasshouses at Birmingham Botanical Gardens (The winning photograph!)

Photo by Christine Wright 

 

Lush growth in the rock garden at Birmingham Botanical Gardens.

Photo by Christine Wright

 

Golden evening sun behind the summer house at the Botanical Gardens.

Photo by Christine Wright

 

Birmingham Botanical Gardens. The aviary at sunset.

Photo by Christine Wright

 

"Raindrops on roses..." Birmingham Botanical Gardens.

Photo by Christine Wright

 

Maple leaves starting to turn at Birmingham Botanical Gardens.

Photo by Christine Wright

 

Cherry blossom, Botanical Gardens, Birmingham (Spring 2018)

Photo by Christine Wright

 

Japanese Garden, Birmingham Botanical Gardens (April 2018)

Photo by Christine Wright

 

 

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