Featuring

People & community
Displaying until 24 Aug 2019 - FreeTimePays

BirminghamWeAre - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!

With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome Birmingham as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about the City.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is Birmingham!

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BirminghamWeAre - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!




With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome Birmingham as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about the City.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is Birmingham!


BirminghamWeAre is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

BirminghamWeAre delivers a digital space for people who are passionate about Birmingham and want to do whatever they can to help their community.

At BirminghamWeAre, we help connect people where passions are shared; we give people FREE access to their very own digital space where they can promote their passion; and we recognise people for the contributions they make through the allocation of Passion Points. Interested? Connect with us HERE.

The reach of FreeTimePays is huge and is growing with Communities of Passion being rolled out across the UK. 

Companies and organisations keen to support People with Passion play an essential role and we have a range of partnership, sponsorship and advertising packages available.

We can even go as far as to set groups and networks up with their own portal so they can grow their own branded Community of Passion linked to their own website or social media account.

View our Partnership arrangements or connect with us HERE.

Now let's show you what you get with FreeTimePays. 

FreeTimePays

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Passport, Community Workspace and Community Matchmaker. Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

FreeTimePays is here for people who really want to become involved in their community or with their particular passion and for those people who are really serious about making a difference. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the great ideas with those who have the potential to turn an idea into something that really does make a difference.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways.

They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the opportunity to take up offers and win prizes.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or project.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share in building evidence, acquiring knowledge and developing plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of facilities and tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is MAKING A DIFFERENCE. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the GREAT IDEAS with those who have the potential to turn an IDEA into something that really does MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Matchmaker is where the dreamers can join with the dream makers – with those who are more than happy to put their support, their resources, their connections, and their wealth of experience behind the idea and behind the passionate people responsible for coming up with the idea.

These are the community drivers, the investors, the philanthropists, the funders of great initiatives, the Lottery, and those from local government and the public sector who are responsible for the provision of public services.

These are the people and the organisations who are in positions of making things happen for those who are passionate and inspired to want to make a difference.

For more detail on what is provided by FreeTimePays connect HERE.

BirminghamWeAre

BirminghamWeAre will grow as a shared space for the many individuals, communities and businesses that will want to connect and share in their passion for their community.

Their work, their ideas and their proposals can be pulled together in the one collaborative space giving them access to a huge resource bank for sharing images, documents and web links. 

In this space people can chat in a secure environment if they wish; they can set up and promote events; or they can communicate with any of the FreeTimePays Communities through creating and submitting posts.

We would be delighted to tell you more.

Contact Jonathan Bostock at jonathan.bostock@freetimepays.com or connect HERE with FreeTimePays for more information on sharing your passion for Birmingham.

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50 passion points

Featuring

People & community
Displaying until 23 Aug 2019 - FreeTimePays

Are you passionate about Birmingham? Join Us!

BirminghamWeAre is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact for Birmingham.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Birmingham and connect with people who share their passion.

View more

Are you passionate about Birmingham? Join Us!




BirminghamWeAre is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact for Birmingham.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Birmingham and connect with people who share their passion.


BirminghamWeAre is all about engaging people in the passion that is Birmingham.

BirminghamWeAre is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

Connect with us HERE and take your passion to the next level.

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40 passion points

Featuring

People & community
Displaying until 31 Dec 2018 - FreeTimePays

Connect with FreeTimePays for social impact, economic growth and community engagement

Take up a partnership with FreeTimePays, advertise, build brand image or even launch your own community of passion using FreeTimePays digital technology.

 

 

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Connect with FreeTimePays for social impact, economic growth and community engagement




Take up a partnership with FreeTimePays, advertise, build brand image or even launch your own community of passion using FreeTimePays digital technology.

 

 


There are many ways you can use and deploy FreeTimePays technology to engage your community and support your objectives. 

 

Take a look at the packages we offer and Connect with us for a solution that is tailored to meet your precise requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call us on 0121 410 5520 or Connect with us to discuss our partnerships.

 

For more about the FreeTimePays engagement suite and the many applications for engaging, inspiring and rewarding people for collectively making a difference, see more details here.

 

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80 passion points

Introducing

People & community
13 Nov 2018 - FreeTimePays

BirminghamWeAre - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion making all the difference!

Two years ago the idea of a digital space for people who want to make a difference and create social and economic impact was first conceived as a created here in Birmingham digital product. Two years later and major scale is on the cards with a huge roll out planned. 

See the full post for why it offers so much for neighbourhoods as well as the West Midlands region.

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BirminghamWeAre - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion making all the difference!




Two years ago the idea of a digital space for people who want to make a difference and create social and economic impact was first conceived as a created here in Birmingham digital product. Two years later and major scale is on the cards with a huge roll out planned. 

See the full post for why it offers so much for neighbourhoods as well as the West Midlands region.


 

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30 passion points

Gallery

Construction & regeneration
13 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square

One Chamberlain Square is having the last of the sills at the top and bottom of the main tier, the stipes on the back are now on the full height of the building. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of One Chamberlain Square




One Chamberlain Square is having the last of the sills at the top and bottom of the main tier, the stipes on the back are now on the full height of the building. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


 

Photos by Daniel Sturley

Full Gallery of the Construction of One Chamberlain Square

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Did you know?

Architecture
13 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

Calthorpe Estates: Edgbaston - a selection of Georgian / Regency / Victorian villas / town houses

Edgbaston the picture perfect suburb of Birmingham has long been managed by the Calthorpe Estates. You would see around white houses dating back to the Georgian and Regency periods, as well as from the Victorian era. Mostly the area between the Hagley Road, Harborne Road, Calthorpe Road and Church Road (and the connecting roads in the area).

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Calthorpe Estates: Edgbaston - a selection of Georgian / Regency / Victorian villas / town houses




Edgbaston the picture perfect suburb of Birmingham has long been managed by the Calthorpe Estates. You would see around white houses dating back to the Georgian and Regency periods, as well as from the Victorian era. Mostly the area between the Hagley Road, Harborne Road, Calthorpe Road and Church Road (and the connecting roads in the area).


St George's School Edgbaston

Located at 31 Calthorpe Road. A Grade II listed building dates to 1835. Was formerly the Edgbaston College for Girls. Mainly includes a large formerly detached Grecio-Egyptian villa. Extended in 1883-86 on the foundation of the college. The school additions were by the architect J. A. Chatwin.

27 and 28 Calthorpe Road

In 2015 this was occupied by the RoSPA. Grade II listed building, a pair of three storey semi-detached stucco Calthorpe Estate villas built in 1830. No 27 was altered in 1850.

37 and 38 Calthorpe Road

A pair of semi-detached stucco 2 storey villas built in 1835, they are Grade II listed. Canted pilaster bay windows was added in 1860. Otto Robert Frisch and Rudolf Peierls lived at no 38 while they were working at the University of Birmingham on nuclear research which led to the first atomic bomb (this was from February to March 1940).

41, 42 and 43 Calthorpe Road

This is a pair of semi-detached stucco faced Calthorpe Estate villas built in 1830, they are Grade II listed buildings. In 2015 WPR was at no 43. Canted bay windows were added in 1860.

3 and 4 Highfield Road

A pair of semi detached houses built in 1830. Stucco in the late Regency style. Some parts were later added in 1860. J. R. R. Tolkien lived at no 4 from 1910 until 1911. It is now the Highfield Day Nursery and Preschool

More more on J R R Tolkien see this post J.R.R. Tolkien's Birmingham (inspiration for The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings.

The Edgbaston - 18 Highfield Road

This is a Grade II listed building at 18 and 19 Highfield Road in Edgbaston. Built in 1840 it is a pair of symmetrical classical stucco villas. The right hand ground floor window of no 18 was replaced sometime between 1880 and 1890. There is coach house at no 18. The coach house at no 19 had been rebuilt. The Edgbaston is a Boutique Hotel & Cocktail Lounge.

 

Simpsons Restaurant - 20 Highfield Road

This property dates to 1840 and is Grade II listed. A large detached stucco villa. It's front entrance is on Westbourne Crescent. The rear on Highfield Road dates to 1855. Simpsons Restaurant was founded in 1993 by two chefs and it is one of Birmingham's restaurans with a Michelin Star.

The Highfield - 22 Highfield Road

The Highfield is a gastro pub that opened in recent years. Owned by the Peach family. The building is not listed, but it still retains an old sundial to the left! They modified the building removing two side doors that used to be there before.

26 Highfield Road

This property doesn't appear to be listed, but it has a blue plaque on it from the Birmingham Civic Society. Edward Richard Taylor (1838 - 1912) was an art teacher and William Howson Taylor (1876 - 1935) was a potter. They both lived here. The plaque was also presented by the Calthorpe Estates Residents Society.

Boston Tea Party - 30 Harborne Road

Boston Tea Party had originally hoped to open a cafe in Moseley, but the site they wanted later went to Prezzo (which was later replaced by Sorrento Lounge). Edgbaston is probably a better location for them here anyway. This building is not listed.

The Physician - 36 Harborne Road

The original building is over 180 years old dating to the 1830s. The BMI (Birmingham Medical Institute) was in this building from 1954 until their lease ran out in 2013. Later turned into a pub The Physician opened in 2016. The building is believed to have housed the 'Sampson Gangee Library for the History of Medicine' possibly commissioned in 1863 by Calthorpe Estates. It's on the corner with Highfield Road.

38 Harborne Road

Every Christmas the Calthorpe Estates places these Christmas reindeers at various places around Edgbaston. This property dates to about 1835 and is close to the corner with Highfield Road. There is a coach house to the left. It's a Grade II listed building.

105 Harborne Road

There is a blue plaque on this house for Francis Brett Young from the Birmingham Civic Society and the Francis Brett Young Society. A novelist, poet and physician, who lived here from 1905-6. The house itself is Grade II listed and dates to 1830. A pair of identical stucco houses. Both of the houses here have coach houses (now just garages).

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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50 passion points

Inspiration

People & community
11 Nov 2018 - FreeTimePays

We will never forget them!

Selection of wonderful photography taken by Daniel Sturley as Birmingham remembers all its heroes on Remembrance Day in Cathedral Square, Colmore Row. 

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We will never forget them!




Selection of wonderful photography taken by Daniel Sturley as Birmingham remembers all its heroes on Remembrance Day in Cathedral Square, Colmore Row. 


Courtesy Daniel Sturley

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30 passion points

Gallery

Environment & green spaces
11 Nov 2018 - Christine Wright

Enjoying the Autumn in Kings Heath Park.

Take the full post to view the lovely Autumn colours captured at Kings Heath Park, Birmingham.

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Enjoying the Autumn in Kings Heath Park.




Take the full post to view the lovely Autumn colours captured at Kings Heath Park, Birmingham.


The glorious autumn colours in Kings Heath Park this year have been enjoyed by young and old, in sunshine and in rain. We are so lucky to have such a beautiful greenspace in Kings Heath!

Enjoy this gallery of photography taken in Autumn 2018 in the park.

Photography by Christine Wright

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Did you know?

History & heritage
11 Nov 2018 - Luke Harris

Perry Barr Greyhound Racing Track was originally Birmingham’s athletics venue

Birmingham’s only remaining greyhound Stadium in Perry Barr was firstly the home of Birchfield Harriers Athletic Club.This was opened as the ‘Alexander Sports Ground’ and was named after W.W. Alexander, an instrumental figure in the clubs history.In 1977, Birchfield Harriers left and moved to the Alexander Stadium, one of the key venues for the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

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Gallery

People & community
11 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

Remembrance Sunday in Birmingham in past November's

Remembrance Sunday in Birmingham in past years. A parade down Broad Street in November 2012. The Remembrance service in Centenary Square in 2014, and in Victoria Square in 2017.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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Remembrance Sunday in Birmingham in past November's




Remembrance Sunday in Birmingham in past years. A parade down Broad Street in November 2012. The Remembrance service in Centenary Square in 2014, and in Victoria Square in 2017.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.


Broad Street - Remembrance parade - 11th November 2012

Remembrance Sunday service in Centenary Square on 9th November 2014

Remembrance Sunday service in Victoria Square on 12th November 2017

Photos taken by Elliott Brown in November 2012, 2014 and 2017.

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40 passion points

Gallery

Architecture
09 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

Birmingham Council House - the seat of local Government in Birmingham

After the recent Birmingham We Are event at the Council House, thought I'd do a post about the building itself! The original building was built from 1874 until 1879 from a design by Yeoville Thomason in the classical style. A Grade II* listed building where the Councillors meet.

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Birmingham Council House - the seat of local Government in Birmingham




After the recent Birmingham We Are event at the Council House, thought I'd do a post about the building itself! The original building was built from 1874 until 1879 from a design by Yeoville Thomason in the classical style. A Grade II* listed building where the Councillors meet.


Birmingham Council House

Located in what is now Victoria Square (formerly the Council House Square until 1901). Seen below in 2009 when the previous 103 Colmore Row was still standing. It was built between 1874 and 1879. The first extension was later built from 1881 until 1885 (including the Museum & Art Gallery). Yeoville Thomason was the architect for that extension as well as the original building.

The second extension was built between 1911 and 1919 by the architects Ashley & Newman (including the Museum & Art Gallery extension and the Gas Hall). Here we are mostly concentrating on the original building.

The seat of local government where the councillors of Birmingham City Council debate things, consider what buildings to be built or what needs to be demolished, and various other matters, including the waste service and local parks. View below from 2010.

Seen in 2017 was French Nationals (that live in the West Midlands) queuing to vote in the French Presidential election (later won by Emmanuel Macron). The Council House can also be used as a polling station for British General or Local Elections.

Every year from October to December, there are poppies placed below the balcony of the Council House, as well as the Happy Christmas Birmingham sign. The Remembrance service in 2017 was held in front of the Council House (in 2018 it's moved to Birmingham Cathedral). The Birmingham Frankfurt Christmas Market is usually in Victoria Square from November to December each year.

The clock tower at the Council House is nicknamed Big Brum, and can be seen mainly from Chamberlain Square. It is close to the main entrance of the Museum & Art Gallery. It was built in 1885 as part of the first extension to the Council House. The clock was donated by A. Follett Osler. The name is similar to Big Ben (at the Palace of Westminster in London) which it alluded to.

When the 1974 - 2013 Birmingham Central Library stood, it wasn't possible to see Big Brum from Centenary Square and the Library of Birmingham. After the old library was demolished in 2016 the Museum and Council House was visible from this side for the first time in a long time. One and Two Chamberlain Square are currently being built at Paradise Birmingham, and Centenary Way was extended towards Chamberlain Square. It is now possible to see Big Brum from Centenary Square!

The side of the Council House on Eden Place between 125 Colmore Row. There is four unused red phone boxes down here. At one point the box closest to Colmore Row was used by Jake's Coffee Box, but I think that closed down a while ago now. All the phone boxes are available to let. All four are of K6 type and are Grade II listed. Designed in 1935 by Sir Giles Gilbert
Scott.

This side of the Council House seen on what was once a part of Edmund Street that stretched as far as the old Victorian Central Library building. The Water Hall gallery is on this side. It is opposite the Gas Hall and Council House Extension (where the rest of the Museum & Art Gallery can be accessed). Entrance on this side of the Council House is for pass holders only. Signs direct you around to the Victoria Square entrance.

While at the Birmingham We Are event, gave me an opportunity to have a quick look around at the interior. Sure that there is more to see, but this was what I got.

The ceiling and chandeliers in the Banqueting Suite. This was the main room that we were in for those 3 hours. The sculptures on the ceiling looked especially fascinating to me! So many columns in here. The balcony is outside of this room, where visitors could stand up there including winning sports teams.

Sitting in the Drawing Room during the talks / videos, I noticed this mural behind the chandelier. In the middle looks like a person sitting on a chair / throne in a doric column temple.

The Glass Corridor.

Another corridor on the 1st floor. Was a series of portraits down here.

The dome and chandelier above the Grand Staircase. They don't build them like this any more!

The Grand Staircase from the top. Halfway up was a statue of Prince Albert (left) and Queen Victoria (right).

The Grand Staircase heading back down to the Victoria Square entrance / exit. There was several busts down here and plaques.

 

Photos by Elliott Brown

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Did you know?

Civic pride
08 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

George Dawson a non-conformist preacher who called for Civic Reform

There used to be a statue for many years on Edmund Street close to Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, but it went into storage. What happened to it? Well it was of George Dawson and it's now at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre. A non-conformist preacher who called for civic reform. Born in 1821 and died in 1876. There is also several busts of this Victorian gentleman!

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George Dawson a non-conformist preacher who called for Civic Reform




There used to be a statue for many years on Edmund Street close to Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, but it went into storage. What happened to it? Well it was of George Dawson and it's now at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre. A non-conformist preacher who called for civic reform. Born in 1821 and died in 1876. There is also several busts of this Victorian gentleman!


George Dawson

Born in London in 1821, he moved to Birmingham in 1844 to become minister of the Mount Zion Baptist Chapel. He left the Baptist Church in 1845 and he become minister of the theologically liberal Church of the Saviour. While there he developed the concept of the Civic Gospel.

He gave sermons to the likes of Joseph Chamberlain and other local politicians of the day. He lectured for the city to be transformed and Joseph Chamberlain answered him as a visionary social reforming Mayor in the 1870s.

The statue of George Dawson has moved about a quite a bit since it was made by Thomas Woolner in 1880. It's moved from Victoria Square to Chamberlain Square to eventually a spot on Edmund Street. I think under the link bridge of the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. It was eventually moved to storage and is now at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre. In the area full of classic cars, fire engines etc!

You can see a photo of the statues last location here George Dawson, Chamberlain Square on the Wikimedia Commons (from Geograph). As you can see it used to have railings around it.

The statue depicts Dawson in a full-length frock coat with his hands clapsed together. In the Francis Frith photo archive, they have a photo dated 1896 with the statue close to the Chamberlain Memorial. At the time it was under a canopy that resembled the Chamberlain Memorial. It featured the heads of Bunyan, Carlyle, Cromwell and Shakespeare, symoblising Religion, Letters, Governments and Poetry. The Thomas Woolner statue of 1880 was disliked so it kept getting moved around. Another statue was commissioned in 1881 from F J Williamson.

This photo shows the unusual view of the George Dawson statue amongst all the machines that are surrounding it at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre. Hopefully one day it will come out of storage and be put in a prominent location for all to see!

Also in the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre was this bronze bust of George Dawson. The note next to it just says that he was A campaigner for civic reform. It was located in the warehouse. You can see the bust and the statue on the free open days that they have at the centre. Any other times you have to book.

Next we head up to the Library of Birmingham and go up to Level 9. Just outside of the Shakespeare Memorial Room was this large marble bust on George Dawson. The area is the Skyline Viewpoint. Not far from this bust is a foundation stone from the old Victorian Birmingham Library. He gave an address at the first Birmingham Central Library in 1866. That library was partly damaged by a fire in 1879 was was rebuilt and enlarged by 1882. That time the second library was opened by John Bright MP. The library would survive until 1974 when it was demolished after the last Central Library opened (that to would close in 2013 and be demolished in 2016).

In 2016 there was an exhibition on at the Library of Birmingham in the Gallery on Level 3 called Our Shakespeare. They had a terracotta model of George Dawson in one of the glass cases. It was probably a study for the statue by the sculptor Thomas Wollner, which was completed in 1880. George Dawson died suddenly aged 55 at Kings Norton on the 30th November 1876.

The same terracotta model / bust of George Dawson was later seen in the Shakespeare Memorial Room at the Library of Birmingham on Level 9 of the library. Apparently Dawson was the first President of the Birmingham Shakespeare Club, he was also a noted Birmingham philanthropist and politician. The sign next to it says the statue it was a study of was later on Great Charles Street.

Photos by Elliott Brown

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40 passion points

Inspiration

People & community
07 Nov 2018 - FreeTimePays

Wow! A wonderful celebration of Birmingham passion by Birmingham's people with passion

Such a great event held at Birmingham's Council House with a wonderful welcome by the Lord Mayor celebrates Birmingham culture, creativity, history and heritage.  From organisers of the annual Celebration of a City, BirminghamWeAre, a big thank you to all involved!  Take the full post to view a selection of great photography of an amazing showcase. 

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Wow! A wonderful celebration of Birmingham passion by Birmingham's people with passion




Such a great event held at Birmingham's Council House with a wonderful welcome by the Lord Mayor celebrates Birmingham culture, creativity, history and heritage.  From organisers of the annual Celebration of a City, BirminghamWeAre, a big thank you to all involved!  Take the full post to view a selection of great photography of an amazing showcase. 


Opening of the Celebration of a City. Courtesy Dan Ricardo

Welcoming words from Lord Mayor of Birmingham. Courtesy Karen Cross

Great performane from Access Creative College. Courtesy Dan Ricardo

Showcase at the Celebration of a City. Courtesy Kevin Maslin

Lord Mayor with Amrit Singh. Courtesy Amrit Singh

Tammie Naughton, contributor to the Birmingham Gems calendar. Courtesy Tammie Naughton

Kevin Maslin, contributor to the Birmingham Gems calendar. Courtesy Kevin Maslin

Christine Wright, contributor to the Birmingham Gems calendar. Courtesy Tammie Naughton

Imran Ali-Bashir, contributor to the Birmingham Gems calendar.  Courtesy Tammie Naughton.

Live Art at the Celebration of a City. Courtesy Victoria Ball

Matt 'man' Windle - poet and boxer. Courtesy Daniel Ricardo.

Great speeches at Celebration of a City. Courtesy Daniel Sturley. 

The magnificent Birmingham Gems calendar. Courtesy Victoria Ball. 

 

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30 passion points

Did you know?

History & heritage
07 Nov 2018 - Luke Harris

Jack Price: Birmingham's First Marathon Champion

Jack Price, who ran for Small Heath Harriers won the first ever Marathon race to take place in the Midlands in May 1908. This race acted as a trial race for the 1908 Olympics held in London. After being selected for the British team, Price withdrew from the race after 15 miles in extremely hot weather.

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News & Updates

Art, culture & creativity
06 Nov 2018 - Noushka Galley

First completed university project submitted

I maintain a blog on my site linked on both this post and on my profile.
Please show your support by checking out my work and feel free to get in touch if you like the look of my working methods and want me to illustrate or edit anything for you.

http://noushka7.wixsite.com/illustration/single-post/2018/11/06/First-completed-project-submitted

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First completed university project submitted


I maintain a blog on my site linked on both this post and on my profile.
Please show your support by checking out my work and feel free to get in touch if you like the look of my working methods and want me to illustrate or edit anything for you.

http://noushka7.wixsite.com/illustration/single-post/2018/11/06/First-completed-project-submitted


I am being encouraged by my university to record work including development, explain concepts and pre4sent final work to a profession standard. It gets me into a good habit for when I compile my portfolio later this year.

Below are some pages from a PDF presenting my work from a project I just handed in.

There are several briefs included and all my solutions are derived from my collection of Japanese artefacts gathered over the Summer months.

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News & Updates

Construction & regeneration
04 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley

Birmingham Construction Update - November 2018

Exchange Square now has it's main structure up to level with Maclaren House, a new crane has been installed on the site of 103 Colmore Row, the steel work on Three Centenary Square is rising around the central core, Bank Tower Two is up to the 30th floor and One Chamberlain Square is getting its final external details finished. Lots more photos and links to galleries in the full post.

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Birmingham Construction Update - November 2018




Exchange Square now has it's main structure up to level with Maclaren House, a new crane has been installed on the site of 103 Colmore Row, the steel work on Three Centenary Square is rising around the central core, Bank Tower Two is up to the 30th floor and One Chamberlain Square is getting its final external details finished. Lots more photos and links to galleries in the full post.


Eastside Construction Feature

 

Arena Central Feature

 

Bank Towers One and Two Feature

 

One Chamberlain Square Feature

 

Arena Central Feature

 

Crane Photography Feature 

 

Arena Central Feature

 

Two Chamberlain Square Feature

Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Did you know?

History & heritage
04 Nov 2018 - Luke Harris

Birmingham's bid for the 1992 Olympic Games

In October 1986, Birmingham went up against five other cities for the right to host the 1992 Olympic Games. The overwhelming favourite to win the bid was Barcelona, which won in the third round of voting. If Birmingham had been successful, it would have seen many new stadiums constructed, including a new athletics stadium built upon the site of the NEC.

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Birmingham's bid for the 1992 Olympic Games




In October 1986, Birmingham went up against five other cities for the right to host the 1992 Olympic Games. The overwhelming favourite to win the bid was Barcelona, which won in the third round of voting. If Birmingham had been successful, it would have seen many new stadiums constructed, including a new athletics stadium built upon the site of the NEC.


The full story of Birmingham’s bid can be found here:

http://www.playingpasts.co.uk/articles/general/the-tonic-to-boost-britains-sagging-reputation-in-international-sport-birminghams-bid-for-the-1992-olympic-games/

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
02 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley

Construction at Arena Central - September 2018

Construction at Arena Central powers on with the start of the main structure of Three Arena Central, the new HQ for HMRC Midlands and Dandara is almost externally complete. More photos of the site in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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Construction at Arena Central - September 2018




Construction at Arena Central powers on with the start of the main structure of Three Arena Central, the new HQ for HMRC Midlands and Dandara is almost externally complete. More photos of the site in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Construction & regeneration
01 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square

Two Chamberlain Square is continuing to rise at Paradise Birmingham, it's now looming over Centenary Way producing a wide canyon feel on the way down to the Museum and Art Gallery.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square




Two Chamberlain Square is continuing to rise at Paradise Birmingham, it's now looming over Centenary Way producing a wide canyon feel on the way down to the Museum and Art Gallery.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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History & heritage
30 Oct 2018 - Luke Harris

Birmingham's failed bid for the 1992 Olympics article

‘THE TONIC TO BOOST BRITAIN’S SAGGING REPUTATION IN INTERNATIONAL SPORT?’ BIRMINGHAM’S BID FOR THE 1992 OLYMPIC GAMES

http://www.playingpasts.co.uk/articles/general/the-tonic-to-boost-britains-sagging-reputation-in-international-sport-birminghams-bid-for-the-1992-olympic-games/ 

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Civic pride
30 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Joseph Chamberlain: Birmingham's visionary Mayor in the late 19th Century

A look at Joseph Chamberlain who as well as later being an MP for Birmingham, before that served several years as the Mayor of the town (it didn't become a City until 1888). A member of the Liberal Party, he was elected Mayor of Birmingham in 1873, holding that title until 1876 when he was elected to Parliament. Various clocks and monuments are around the city in his name.

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Joseph Chamberlain: Birmingham's visionary Mayor in the late 19th Century




A look at Joseph Chamberlain who as well as later being an MP for Birmingham, before that served several years as the Mayor of the town (it didn't become a City until 1888). A member of the Liberal Party, he was elected Mayor of Birmingham in 1873, holding that title until 1876 when he was elected to Parliament. Various clocks and monuments are around the city in his name.


Joseph Chamberlain

The Chamberlain Memorial is in Chamberlain Square in the centre of Birmingham (now the Paradise Birmingham construction site). It was erected in 1880 to commemorate the public service of Joseph Chamberlain. It was erected during Chamberlain's lifetime. By the time the memorial was installed, Chamberlain has been an MP for Birmingham since 1876.  Chamberlain was elected to the Town Council in November 1869. He was elected Mayor in November 1873 and resigned the office in June 1876 on being returned as a representative of the borough to Parliament. During his Mayoralty many great works were advanced. And his devotion to the Water & Gas undertakings. (there is halls at the Council House called Water Hall and Gas Hall that are now part of the Museum & Art Gallery).

Seen here with Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, the vantage point with the statue of James Watt.

Seen with the now demolished Birmingham Central Library.

Medallion bus of Joseph Chamberlain on the memorial.

Birmingham's failed bid for UK City of Culture in 2010 for 2013.

A more recent photo of the Chamberlain Memorial with One and Two Chamberlain Square under construction during July 2018. Part of Paradise Birmingham. Apart from the Museum & Art Gallery and the Town Hall, it is the only thing to survive from the late 19th century period (the other buildings demolished and the statues gone into storage).

 

Seen at the University of Birmingham is the Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower, also known as Old Joe. It is the tallest free standing clock tower in the world. The tower was built to commemorate Joseph Chamberlain who was the first Chancellor of the University. Construction started in 1900 and finished in 1908. It held the record for the tallest building in Birmingham from 1908 until 1965 (when the BT Tower opened).

Please also have a look at my post comparing this tower to the campanile tower that inspired it in Italy here Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower inspired by the Torre del Mangia in Siena, Italy.

Seen with the Great Hall from Aston Webb Boulevard (Selly Oak New Road). Designed by Sir Aston Webb and Ingress Bell (built 1900 - 1909).

Close up of the tower in 2009.

The view from Mindelsohn Way, Selly Oak in 2017.

For a period earlier during 2018 the clock was stuck at 12 o'clock, but after it was repaired the clock was once again seen to be ticking again!

Welcome to University Station in Edgbaston, on the University of Birmingham's main Edgbaston campus. When you get off the train, take a look at this image of Joseph Chamberlain before heading up the steps. And read the message to the left. You may also notice the Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower on the steps as you go up.

 

In the Jewellery Quarter there is a clock at the junction with Vyse Street, Warstone Lane and Frederick Street called the Chamberlain Clock. It commemorated the visit of Joseph Chamberlain to South Africa between 1902 and 1903 when he was the Secretary for State for the Colonies. It was erected by his constituents the electors of West Birmingham. Mr Chamberlain landed at Durban on the 26th December 1902 and sailed from Cape Town on the 25th February 1903. The clock was unveiled in 1904 during Chamberlain's lifetime.

There is also a clock like this one in Five Ways, but that one does not commemorate Joseph Chamberlain. And also another similar clock at Aston Cross.

Seen with the Rose Villa Tavern in the Jewellery Quarter.

These views were from 2009, and was traffic constantly going past the clock, so got cars in some of these old photos.

The clock is one of the main landmarks in the Jewellery Quarter. It's a short walk from Jewellery Quarter Station. It's also close to Warstone Lane Cemetery (also known as Brookfields Cemetery).

Highbury Hall was the Birmingham residence of Joseph Chamberlain from 1880 until his death in 1914. Was commissioned in 1878 and built in 1879. Is now a Grade II* listed building and in the care of the Chamberlain Highbury Trust (formerly Birmingham City Council). It took it's name from the Highbury area of London that Chamberlain lived in as a child. There is extensive grounds that now includes Highbury Park. John Henry Chamberlain was the architect (he wasn't a relation of the Chamberlain family).

The main entrance with the car park. A blue plaque is on the left.

The garden to the hall. There is paths that leads out to Highbury Park and surviving parts of Highbury Hall's original gardens via an orchard.

The first floor landing at Highbury Hall.

Portrait of Joseph Chamberlain MP painted by Nestor Cambier at Highbury Hall.

Artefacts seen at the Birmingham History Galleries about Chamberlain's Birmingham.

Including a postcard of Corporation Street dated 1902. Home Rule and the Irish Question by Joseph Chamberlain, MP 1887.

A mug with the head of Joseph Chamberlain.

Close up look at the mug that looks like Joseph Chamberlain.

Souvenir from the 30th anniversary of Joseph Chamberlain being elected to Parliament for Birmingham in 1876, from 1906.

Photos by Elliott Brown

 

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History & heritage
30 Oct 2018 - Luke Harris

1867 National Olympian Games held in Birmingham

1867 National Olympian Games held in Birmingham

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1867 National Olympian Games held in Birmingham




1867 National Olympian Games held in Birmingham


In June 1867, Birmingham hosted the National Olympian Games, an event partially organised by Dr William Penny Brookes of Much Wenlock, a figure who inspired Pierre de Coubertin to form the International Olympic Committee. The genuine Olympic forefather took place over three days and featured contests in sports including athletics, swimming and cricket.

Article Link: http://www.playingpasts.co.uk/articles/general/birminghams-first-olympics-the-1867-national-olympian-games/

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Construction & regeneration
29 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Bank Tower Two

Bank Tower Two now has it's main structure up to the 29th floor and much more cladding is installed or being prepared. The tower looks amazing in the winter sunlight! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Bank Tower Two




Bank Tower Two now has it's main structure up to the 29th floor and much more cladding is installed or being prepared. The tower looks amazing in the winter sunlight! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Transport
25 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

Cadbury No 14 - the diesel locomotive at Cadbury World

Before you start your visit to Cadbury World, you can't help but notice the diesel locomotive near the car park. It's Cadbury No 14. And has been located where it is now since 2007. Built in 1957 it was at the Cadbury factory at Moreton. Moved to the Llangollen Railway Society in 1978. Was donated to Cadbury by Burton Foods who now operate from Moreton.

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Cadbury No 14 - the diesel locomotive at Cadbury World




Before you start your visit to Cadbury World, you can't help but notice the diesel locomotive near the car park. It's Cadbury No 14. And has been located where it is now since 2007. Built in 1957 it was at the Cadbury factory at Moreton. Moved to the Llangollen Railway Society in 1978. Was donated to Cadbury by Burton Foods who now operate from Moreton.


It's a 20 ton diesel locomotive, but can be easily mistaken for a steam locomotive based on it's design!

The front of the locomotive says Hudswell. It was made by Hudswell Clarke and has the number D1012. It was built in 1956.

Moreton is in Merseyside. It had been at the Cadbury Schweppes, Moreton site, before it moved to Premier Brands UK Ltd in Moreton. After that it was moved to the car park of Cadbury World in 2007.

There was another Cadbury No 14 that used to run on the Cadbury factory's private railway, but I don't think this one was ever used at Bournville, only at Moreton.

 

After it left the Cadbury site at Moreton, Hudswell Clarke 0-4-0DM (D1012/1956) for a period was used at the heritage railway at Llangollen from 1978 until 2007.

 

While the Cadbury private railway no longer exists, it is nice to see a locomotive from Cadbury's past, even if it wasn't originally based at factory at Bournville.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown in November 2015 on a visit to Cadbury World.

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Transport
24 Oct 2018 - Elliott Brown

City of Birmingham 46235 at Thinktank Birmingham Science Museum

A steam locomotive named the City of Birmingham has been preserved and is now in Thinktank (where it can't move). Previously it was housed in the old Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry on Newhall Street until it closed in 1997. The public could see it again at Thinktank from 2001 onwards. In British Rail green. A bit hard to photograph all in one go due to where they put it.

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City of Birmingham 46235 at Thinktank Birmingham Science Museum




A steam locomotive named the City of Birmingham has been preserved and is now in Thinktank (where it can't move). Previously it was housed in the old Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry on Newhall Street until it closed in 1997. The public could see it again at Thinktank from 2001 onwards. In British Rail green. A bit hard to photograph all in one go due to where they put it.


City of Birmingham 46235

Built for the London Midland and Scottish Railway it was a Coronation Class steam locomotive originally with the number of 6235 and was built in 1939 at Crewe. It passed to British Railways in 1948 and was renamed to 46235. It's original colour was crimson lake, but during the Second World War it was given a black livery. The naming ceremony took place for the City of Birmingham at Birmingham New Street Station in March 1945, despite it having the name for years.

After British Railways took it over in 1948, it was given a new short lived blue livery in 1950. It was repainted in Brunswick Green in April 1953. It was withdrawn from service in 1964 and kept the green livery through it's preservation.

The Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry opened in 1951 at the former Elkington Works on Newhall Street. After a period at Nuneaton during preservation, the City of Birmingham locomotive was moved to the museum in 1966 which they built around it. It remained there until 1997 when the museum closed. This museum was free to enter.

Thinktank Birmingham Science Museum opened to the public in 2001 at Millennium Point, where they again built the new building / museum around where they placed the locomotive. In a fixed position so it can't move, but they built a pathway to the side so visitors can get up and close to it. The museum has an entrance fee (but you can get a discount if you get a bus or train voucher online).

There is information panels on this side, close to where you can see the City of Birmingham name plate, plus the cities coat of arms.

Light from the Millennium Point windows at the time made it a bit hard to get photos in decent light, but that may have changed since my visit. Although even with the bright light and the new Science Garden outside in Eastside City Park, may still make it a bit hard to see, unless it's a cloudy day.

If you want to get a photo of the side of the locomotive all in one, then it's simply not possible. I had to take a series of photos and later stitch them together to make a panoramic, then alter the photo. My visit with these photos was in 2013.

This is as close as you can get from the front. The locomotive has not steamed since it was preserved back in the 1960s, and anyone wishes to see it on the mainline or on heritage railways in the future, then they would have to remove the wall and windows in front of the locomotive. Having the Thinktank Science Garden in front from 2012 onwards also makes it difficult to remove. I remember seeing it in the old Science Museum on Newhall Street in the 1990s. Back then it may have been able to go back and forward on the rails, but it can't do that now at Thinktank, it's in a fixed position.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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